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Redwood National and State Parks: This week's National Park Getaway

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Date: July 11, 2012
Contact: Candace L. Tinkler, 707-465-7304
Contact: Kat Kirby, 202-208-6843

High up in the canopy of ancient redwood forest, one of the world's rarest seabirds, the marbled murrelet, shares its ethereal home with an entire ecosystem of plants and wildlife thriving hundreds of feet above ground. This week's National Park Getaway travels to California's northwest coast to soak in this splendor of towering trees and majestic overloooks.

Redwood National and State Parks preserve the largest remaining contiguous section of ancient coast redwood forest, including some of the world's tallest and oldest trees. The park's primeval forests, prairies, rivers, coastline, and woodlands are cooperatively managed by the National Park Service and the California Department of Parks and Recreation.

The human footprint in this park dates back more than 4,500 years. The Tolowa, Yurok, Chilula, and Hupa peoples continue to rely on the park for spiritual, cultural, physical, and economic sustenance. The park's landscape holds remnants of its past logging, ranching, fishing and military history.

At Redwood, you can hike among the giants, relax in fields of wildflowers and explore the beaches of the Pacific coast. You'll get a clear view by reading this week's National Park Getaway article at www.nps.gov/getaways.

This News Release can also be viewed, downloaded, and/or printed in PDF format (323 KB).

 

 

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Elk once ranged over most of the United States from Maine to New Mexico. By 1860, the eastern elk had been eliminated by hunters. By 1912, about 124 Roosevelt elk remained in northern California. Prairie Creek Redwood State Park became an elk refuge in 1923 where elk are common today.