FISCAL YEAR 2004

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN

For

Redwood National and State Parks

 

 

Approved: ____________________________________________

Bill Pierce

Superintendent Date

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual Performance Plan

Table of Contents

Cover and Approval Page…………………………………………………….1

Table of Contents……………………………………………………………...2

I Introduction………………………………………………………………6

II Mission and Significance of the Parks……………………………..…7

III Accomplishing Goals…………………………………….……………..8

Organization

Facilities

Financial Resources

IV Measuring Results…………………………………………………….10

V Annual Goals…………………………………………………………11

Goal Category I – Preserve Park Resources--9

Ia1A. Disturbed Lands–Watershed and Forest Restoration

Ia01A. Disturbed Lands–Fire Management

Ia01A. Disturbed Lands–Resource Protection/Illegal Activities

Ia1B. Disturbed Lands–Exotic Plant Species

Ia2C. Threatened and Endangered Species–Marbled Murrelet

Ia02A. Threatened and Endangered Species–Brown Pelican, Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon

Ia02B. Threatened and Endangered Species–Northern Spotted Owl

Ia02C. Threatened and Endangered Species–Anadromous Salmonids

Ia02D. Threatened and Endangered Species–Western Snowy Plover and Tidewater Goby

Ia2X. Native Species of Special Concern

Ia3. Air Quality

Ia4. Water Quality

Ia5. Historic Structures

Ia6. Museum Collections

Ia07. Cultural Landscapes

Ia08. Archeological Sites

Ib01. Natural Resource Inventories

Ib2A. Archeological Baseline

Ib2B. Cultural Landscapes Baseline

Ib2C. Historic Structures Baseline

Ib2D Cultural Resource Baseline–Museum Collections

Ib2E. Cultural Resources Baseline–Ethnographic Resources

Ib2F. Historical Research Baseline

Ib3. Vital Signs

Goal Category II – Visitor Enjoyment--24

IIa1. Visitor Satisfaction

IIa2. Visitor Safety

IIb1. Visitor Understanding and Appreciation

IIb1X. Educational Programs

Goal Category IV – Organizational Effectiveness--27

IVa01. Data Systems

IVa3A. Workforce Development and Performance–Performance Plans Linked to Goals

IVa4A. Workforce Diversity–Underrepresented Groups in Workforce

IVa4B. Workforce Diversity–Women and Minorities in Temporary and Seasonal Workforce

IVa4C. Workforce Diversity–Individuals with Disabilities in the Permanent Workforce

IVa4D. Workforce Diversity– Individuals with Disabilities in Temporary and Seasonal Workforce

Iva5. Employee Housing

IVa6A. Employee Safety–Injury Rate

IVa6B. Employee Safety–COP Hours

IVa06A. Property Loss/Damage

IVb1. Volunteer Hours

IVb2A. Cash Donations

IVb2C. Cooperating Associations

IVbX. Park Partnerships

VI APP Preparers………… ………………………………………34

 

I INTRODUCTION

 

THE GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS ACT OF 1993

In 1993, Congress passed the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) which seeks to make government more effective and efficient. This law requires federal agencies, such as the National Park Service (NPS) to adopt performance based management and to connect agency goals to their operations. A government agency’s performance is assessed by its ability to achieve its goals.

As a result of GPRA, the NPS has developed a Servicewide strategic plan, which outlines its goals and is based on the agency’s mission. This Servicewide strategic plan incorporates planning by each unit of the National Park System. It includes mission goals that define the ideal conditions the NPS wants to achieve. To be able to achieve mission goals, long-term goals are identified. The long-term goals are the desired resource and visitor experience conditions with measurable outcomes and are typically defined in increments of five years. Each National Park unit takes the Servicewide mission and long-term goals and breaks them down into applicable park long-term goals, annual goals, and annual work plans.

 

ABOUT THIS PLAN

This is the Annual Performance Plan for Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP). It covers the period October 1, 2004 – September 30, 2004.

The Annual Performance Plan lists each annual goal in the context of Servicewide mission and long-term goal. Like the Servicewide goal, each annual goal is results or outcome oriented. Each goal is objective, quantified and measurable, with performance measures built into each goal statement. There is a brief narrative explanation included in this plan for each Servicewide mission statement and long-term goal.

 

 

 

II MISSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PARKS

MISSION STATEMENT

Our common mission is to preserve, protect and make available to all people, for their inspiration, enjoyment and education, the ancient forests, scenic coastlines, prairies and streams, and their associated natural and cultural values, which define this World Heritage Site; and to help people forge emotional and recreational ties to these parks.

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PARKS

The following statements define the significant attributes that relate to the parks’ purpose and why the parks were established. Knowing the parks’ significance helps managers set protection priorities and determine desirable visitor experiences.

 RNSP preserve the largest remaining contiguous section of ancient coast redwood forest.

 More than one-third of the lands within the parks have been heavily impacted by timber harvest and are the subject of an internationally recognized restoration program designed to restore integrity and recover lost values.

 RNSP contain a rich variety of biotic communities from the Pacific Coast to the interior mountains.

 RNSP contain 35 miles of scenic Pacific Ocean coastline and about 105,516 acres of coastal topography. The heavy rainfall and powerful rivers are part of the intricate and dynamic hydrologic system.

 RNSP preserve the legacy of 19th and 20th century conservation efforts that led to the establishment of three state parks in the 1920s, a national park in 1968, and an expansion of the national park in 1978.

 Four American Indian cultures with ties to RNSP lands - the Tolowa, Yurok, Chilula, and Hupa peoples - represent a diverse indigenous presence.

 

 

 

 

III ACCOMPLISHING GOALS

 

ORGANIZATION

Redwood National and State Parks consist of Redwood National Park and three long-established California State Parks included within the boundary set by Congress in 1968. Together, these parks include 105,516 acres of federal and state lands in Del Norte and Humboldt counties, situated in northwestern California. Through an agreement signed in 1994 and renewed in 1999, the NPS and the California Department of Parks and Recreation (CDPR) manage all four parks as a single unit. This cooperative approach to park management results in the NPS undertaking projects to protect natural and cultural resources and to provide visitor services in the state parks, and CDPR staff doing likewise on federal lands. This Annual Performance Plan however, reflects solely the NPS activities, personnel, responsibilities, and needs that are involved in, or result from, this interagency cooperative effort to manage these parks.

The NPS has complete responsibility for the administration, operation, protection, and development of federal lands within RNSP. Park staff is organized into five operating divisions: Administration, Interpretation, Visitor Services and Resource Protection, Maintenance, and Resource Management and Science. Staff expertise and specialists include park rangers (protection and interpretation), archeologists, museum curator, biologists, geologists, botanists, prescribed fire specialist, environmental specialist, maintenance employees, information technology specialists and a variety of administrative personnel and supervisors.

The staff will be supplemented and/or supported this year using special project funds, contracts, the assistance of other NPS parks and central offices, and other partners and organizations. The U.S. Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Service, California Department of Transportation, Yurok Tribe, Environmental Protection Agency, USDA Soil Conservation Services, and several nonprofit associations will provide additional, vital assistance through cooperative agreement services or contracts. The Redwood National History Association in addition to helping accomplish education and visitor service goals through literature sales and donations, will provide sales clerks at visitor centers and will sponsor a field seminar program with professional staff at no cost to the park. Finally, the American Youth Hostel concessionaire will provide the only overnight public lodging facility in the parks and contributes to achieving the park’s public services goals.

 

FACILITIES

Park facilities utilized for accomplishing the FY2004 annual goals include:

    1. Information Centers
    1. Outdoor Schools
    1. Historical Structures
    1. Buildings
    1. Housing Units
    1. Wayside Exhibits
    1. Miles of Trail
    1. Backcountry Camping Areas
    1. Concessionaire

 

FINANCIAL RESOURCES

Financial resources available to achieve the FY2004 annual goals include a base operating budget of approximately $7,522,000. This base-operating budget funds a permanent work force of 100 permanent positions, 5-10 term positions, and approximately 75 temporary positions. This work force will be supplemented with over 12,000 hours of Volunteers-in-Parks, 6 Student Conservation Association Assistants, 12,000 hours of work from the California Conservation Corps in exchange for use of park buildings, grant and donation funds, and special project and program funds distributed by the NPS regional and Washington offices

Highlights of the budget, which funds specific goals in the annual performance plan, include:

$2,293,000 Resource Management and Science. These programs include fish & wildlife management activities, protection of threatened and endangered species, vegetation management and removal of exotic species, watershed rehabilitation, planning and environmental compliance, geographic information systems (GIS), cultural resources management and archeology, historic preservation, curatorial activities, liaison with local American Indian tribes, cooperative erosion control activities with private landowners, inventory and monitoring of resources, and supervision of research activities.

$735,000 for Visitor Services and Resource Protection. This program includes visitor protection and public safety, law enforcement, emergency medical services, search & rescue, concessions, backcountry management and fire protection. In addition, protection staff engages in a wide variety of activities focused on protecting resources and is responsible for managing public use, recreation and special events. Approximately $65,000 in Special Use Permit fees will be used to support visitor services activities at Freshwater Spit area and throughout the parks.

$773,000 for Interpretation: This program includes public information and orientation, interpretation, educational programs, and operation of information centers and outdoor schools.

Additionally, of the $250,000 allocated in 2001 from fee revenue, approximately $175,000 remains available to fund production and installation of exhibits at Kuchel Visitor Center. In addition, $123,000 was received in FY2003 from fee revenue to relocate the south entrance sign to the park and to fund eight wayside panels.

$2,103,000 for Facility Operations and Maintenance. These programs include the management, maintenance and repair of roads, trails, public use facilities and grounds, administrative buildings, employee housing, historic structures, utility systems, communications systems, vehicles and heavy equipment.

In addition to the above funds provided for the operation and maintenance of RNSP, it is anticipated that approximately $145,000 project funds distributed on a yearly basis from central NPS accounts will be available for the following projects in FY04: abate asbestos in government housing, repair trail bridge on Redwood Creek Trail, replace wayside exhibit panel, repair and replace picnic tables, and replace area lights at visitor center parking lot in Crescent City. RNSP has also been awarded $394,000 from a TEA 21 grant administered through CALTRANS for the construction of a bike trail approximately 3 miles north of Orick, California.

$402,000 for Park Management. These programs include overall management and supervision, long term planning and development, public relations, interagency liaison, liaison with community organizations, and liaison with elected and appointed government officials at the local, state and national levels.

$908,000 for Park Administration. These programs include all administrative support services, including personnel management, budget and accounting, contracting, purchasing, property management, training and computer systems operations and all IT equipment.

 

IV MEASURING RESULTS

Various methods will be utilized to verify and validate measured values to determine whether or not the NPS has met its stated goals. These measurement tools include visitor and employee surveys; data inventories; site inspections; completion reports for construction projects; visual inspections and surveys for threatened and endangered species and non-native plants; condition and resource assessments for natural and cultural resources; and assessments of fiscal and human resources. Measurement tools might be servicewide program assessment tools, industry standards, or scientific or academic standards.

 

V ANNUAL GOALS

Annual goals are the current year’s increments toward achieving the park’s long-term goals. Long-term goals, in turn, are increments toward achieving mission goals. Mission goals are NPS Servicewide statements of ideal future conditions pursued "in perpetuity" to achieve the mission of RNSP. The annual goals below, therefore, are listed in the context of their long-term and mission goals. A brief narrative description of each mission and long-term goal is also provided.

Following are the park’s goals for FY2004. The numbering sequence follows that of the NPS Servicewide Strategic Plan. Goal numbers may not be consecutive – where numbers are left out, there was no park goal matching the NPS goal.

 

NPS Goal Category I: Preserve Park Resources

This goal, which encompasses the broad mandates of the NPS Organic Act, includes the concepts of biological and cultural diversity and the perpetuation of natural processes within the parks. Goals on natural and cultural resource preservation and restoration in RNSP and the acquisition of knowledge from and about the resources are included here.

NPS MISSION GOAL Ia: Natural and cultural resources and associated values are protected, restored, and maintained in good condition and managed within their broader ecosystem and cultural context.

RNSP MISSION GOAL 1a: The natural and cultural resources of the parks are preserved and protected. Lands, systems and processes that have been altered by modern human activities are restored or replicated. Park facilities are designed and constructed for sustainability and are appropriately located.

 

Ia1A. Disturbed Lands-Watershed and Forest Restoration: By September 30, 2005, 10% of the 54,000 acres of lands disturbed by previous logging, ranching, and development and targeted for restoration in the 1999 GMP are restored.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 8% of lands disturbed by previous logging, ranching, and development are restored.

Prior to their addition to the parks, some lands now within RNSP were subject to intense logging activities, which resulted in the construction of hundreds of miles of roads. When the park was expanded in 1978, Congress authorized a watershed rehabilitation program that was to minimize human induced erosion from previous logging and road building activities. There were an estimated 415 miles of logging roads and over 3000 miles of skid roads within the Redwood Creek portion of the national park. The logging roads and post-logging exposed slopes were prone to erosion and, over time, massive amounts of the eroded sediment washed into Redwood Creek and its tributaries. As of the end of FY2003, approximately 195 miles have been removed, hydrologic patterns restored, original topography restored or approximated, and over 1,000,000 yds3 of sediment has been removed from road stream crossings. The park staff has prioritized the remaining roads to be treated and is continuing its program of erosion control through removal and treatment of abandoned logging roads. Other areas of the parks, outside the Redwood Creek portions of RNSP, also have logging roads that have not yet been inventoried. These roads will be inventoried as available resources and funding allow and proposals for treatment will be developed.

 

Ia01A. Disturbed Lands-Fire Management: By September 30, 2005, the role of fire has been restored to or replicated in 4,600 acres (5%) of the vegetation types where fire has historically occurred as a natural process.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004 the role of fire has been restored to or replicated in 3,600 acres (4%) of the vegetation types where fire has historically occurred as a natural process.

Historically, fires started by lightning and Native Americans burned large areas of RNSP prior to the implementation of effective fire suppression actions in the early twentieth century. These fires were instrumental in preventing the encroachment of Douglas fir into coastal scrub, oak woodlands and prairies and modified the species composition and stand structure of redwood forests. In keeping with NPS and California Department of Parks and Recreation (CDPR) policy, fire is being used to control exotic plants and accomplish specific management objectives dealing with the preservation of prairies, oak woodlands and redwood forests.

 

Ia01A(01). Disturbed Lands–Resource Protection/Illegal Activities: By September 30, 2005, 100% of RNSP lands are covered by strategies, plans, and programs to protect natural resources from unintentional damage, vandalism, or illegal activity.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 80% (80,000 acres) of RNSP lands are covered by strategies, plans, and programs to protect resources from unintentional damage, vandalism and illegal activity

This goal covers efforts by RNSP protection rangers to protect resources within RNSP boundaries from unintentional damage or illegal activities. Efforts include planning for and preventing intentional and unintentional illegal activity occurring in RNSP including plant and animal poaching, illegal wood gathering, illegal off-road vehicle use, vandalism and destruction of government property, and compliance with the NPS and RNSP regulations designed to safeguard and protect natural resources.

Accomplishments under this goal are measured by RNSP plans, standards, protocols, and regulations in place that guide rangers to determine whether resources are used and enjoyed by visitors in such a manner and by such means that the natural resources will remain unimpaired. Analysis of citations issued, intelligence gathered, and cross-linked analysis with resource management data will provide information on which resources and areas should be targeted for additional protection efforts. All protection ranger efforts directed toward assisting visitors to enjoy the parks safely, e.g. search and rescue or emergency services, are covered under goal category 2–Visitor Use and Experience.

 

Ia1B. Disturbed Lands–Exotic Plant Species: By September 30, 2005, targeted non-native plants have been contained on 600 acres of the area targeted in 1999 for containment.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, targeted non-native plants have been contained on 500 acres of the area infested in 1999.

The introduction, establishment, and expansion of alien plants have been identified by the NPS as problems threatening the integrity of park ecosystems for many years. The protection and restoration of natural and cultural resources are often dependent upon the effective control of alien plant species. Alien plants have been an important resource management problem since Redwood National Park was established in 1968. Current activities concentrate on the control of Scotch broom, European beach grass and pampas grass. The expansion of the national park in 1978 increased the scope of the alien plant program significantly due to the large populations of Cape and English ivy found on acquired lands.

 

Ia2C. Threatened and Endangered Species–Marbled Murrelet: By September 30, 2005, 100% of one (1 of 1) federally listed threatened species with a recovery plan requiring NPS action and designated critical habitat in RNSP, presently with a declining status, has a stable population in the parks.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004 the threatened marbled murrelet will be monitored and park actions will comply with guidelines under the Endangered Species Act.

This program goal tracks the status and stability of populations of Marbled Murrelet. This goal includes all efforts expended by the parks’ staff in preserving, protecting, restoring, maintaining, monitoring, or evaluating the habitat and populations of Marbled Murrelets in the parks. It also encompasses efforts to mitigate for impacts from park operations that may affect Marbled Murrelet populations and/or designated critical habitat. All suitable nesting habitat in the three state parks within the national park boundary is designated critical habitat; no critical habitat has been designated on federal lands within the national park boundary.

Murrelets are difficult to census in RNSP because of their small size, cryptic coloration, habit of moving between offshore marine waters where they feed and old growth forests where they nest, and their preference for nesting in the high dense canopy of old growth redwood trees. Estimates of population size throughout the range of the murrelet are very uncertain and this uncertainty makes it difficult to determine whether this progress is being made to achieve this goal. Only in recent years have researchers been able to establish the most basic procedures for determining presence or absence of a breeding population of murrelets in a forest, or to determine the breeding success of a population. This further contributes to the difficulty of determining accomplishments under this goal.

This goal will be achieved when marbled murrelets are delisted, and no recovery efforts are assigned to the NPS. Towards this end approximately $20,000 has been rec’d in FY2004 from Natural Resource Preservation Program for inventorying and monitoring murrelets over a three year period.

 

Ia02A. Threatened and Endangered Species–Brown Pelican, Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon: By September 30, 2005, 66% of three (2 of 3) species federally listed as threatened or endangered with recovery plans requiring NPS actions but without designated critical habitat in RNSP, maintain an improved status in RNSP.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the federally listed bald eagle will be monitored for nesting status and distribution within the park.

The NPS Organic Act and the Endangered Species Act require federal agencies to develop programs for the conservation of listed species and continue monitoring population viability of delisted species. Both Acts reflect NPS responsibilities to determine the conditions of its resources. This program goal tracks from baseline year 1997 the status and stability of populations of Brown Pelican and Bald Eagle. This goal includes all efforts expended by the parks’ staff in preserving, protecting, restoring, maintaining, monitoring, or evaluating the habitat of Brown Pelican and Bald Eagle in the parks. It also encompasses mitigation for impacts from park operations that may affect these two listed species populations and/or critical habitat. Despite the delisting of the Peregrine Falcon, the park is still required to monitor this species during its recovery phase according to the regulatory agency.

 

Ia02B. Threatened and Endangered Species–Northern Spotted Owl and Beach Layia: By September 30, 2005, 100% of one (1 of 1) federally listed threatened species without a recovery plan requiring NPS action or designated critical habitat in RNSP, maintains a stable population in the RNSP.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, compliance points and known spotted owl nest sites will be monitored following USFWS survey protocol guidelines and park actions will comply with guidelines under the Endangered Species Act. Park will continue to monitor and map the populations of Beach Lavia

This goal includes all efforts expended by the parks’ staff in preserving, protecting, restoring, maintaining, monitoring, or evaluating the habitat of Northern Spotted Owls in the parks. It also encompasses evaluation and mitigation of impacts from park operations that may affect Northern Spotted Owl populations.

Northern spotted owls have been monitored since the mid-90s. Regular surveys according to established protocols are conducted, and the nesting success of these owls in the parks is monitored. Surveys and monitoring indicate that this species has a stable population in RNSP.

This species has been the center of controversy over the effects of logging throughout the Pacific Northwest on owl populations. Intense research on this species has established that the owl can successfully breed outside of old growth forests once thought essential for survival. Much of the work done with this species in the park is similar to that prescribed under the 1993 Northwest Forest Plan. Although the NPS is not assigned any recovery actions under the forest plan, adjacent USFS and BLM lands are covered by the requirements of the forest plan. Park staff contribute to accomplishments under the Forest Plan through work on owls in the parks.

In addition, approximately two weeks of park staff’s time is spent annually on monitoring and mapping Beach Layie at Freshwater Spit.

This goal will be accomplished when these species are not listed as threatened, and no effort is required by the NPS toward management for recovery.

 

Ia02C. Threatened and Endangered Species–Anadromous Salmonids: By September 30, 2005, 100% of three (3of 3) federally listed, proposed, or candidate threatened species without designated critical habitat in RNSP or recovery actions assigned to the NPS, and presently with declining status, have stable populations within the parks.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004 the listed coho and chinook salmon and steelhead trout will be surveyed to determine their status and distribution within portions of the park and park actions will comply with guidelines under the Endangered Species Act.

The NPS Organic Act and the Endangered Species Act require federal agencies to develop programs for the conservation of listed species. Both Acts reflect NPS responsibilities in determining the conditions of its resources. This program goal tracks from baseline year 1997 the status and stability of populations of Coho and Chinook salmon. This goal includes all efforts expended by the parks’ staff in preserving, protecting, restoring, maintaining, monitoring, or evaluating the habitat of Coho and Chinook salmon in the parks. It also encompasses mitigation for impacts from park operations that may affect Coho and Chinook salmon populations and/or critical habitat.

 

Ia02D. Threatened and Endangered Species–Western Snowy Plover and Tidewater Goby: By September 30, 2005, 100% of two populations (2 of 2) of federally listed threatened species without recovery actions assigned to the NPS or designated critical habitat in RNSP, and presently with unknown status, have been determined to be present or absent in RNSP.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004 western snowy plover and tidewater goby surveys will continue for determining their status and distribution within the parks.

The NPS Organic Act and the Endangered Species Act require federal agencies to develop programs for the conservation of listed species. Both Acts reflect NPS responsibilities to determine the conditions of its resources. This program goal tracks from baseline year 1997 the status and stability of populations of Tidewater Goby and Snowy Plover. This goal includes all efforts expended by the parks’ staff in preserving, protecting, restoring, maintaining, monitoring, or evaluating the habitat of Tidewater Gobies and Snowy Plovers in the parks, and mitigating for impacts from park operations that may affect Tidewater Goby and Snowy Plover populations and/or critical habitat.

 

Ia2X. Native Species of Special Concern: By September 30, 2005, 100% of 7 populations of plant and animal species of special concern in RNSP are at scientifically acceptable levels.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 80% of 7 populations of plant and animal species of special concern in RNSP are at scientifically acceptable levels.

This goal is related to the servicewide Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) program and results in establishing baseline information on native plant and animal populations in RNSP. These populations are considered to be species of special concern because they are unique or rare, are declining or threatened with extinction in some portion of their range, or are species whose behavior creates aesthetic or economic benefits or detriments to humans. The latest revision of the Redwood National Park Resources Management Plan identifies several large mammals as species of concern in the parks. Appendix H of the 2000 GMP lists all species known from the parks or potentially occurring in the parks that are considered to be species of special concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and the California Native Plant Society (CNPS). Only some of these species are currently monitored because of personnel and funding constraints. This goal captures efforts directed at locating, surveying, inventorying, or managing 7 of these species.

Roosevelt elk, black bears, and mountain lions are classified as park species of special concern because of their behavior in relation to park visitors or to humans residing on lands immediately adjacent to the parks, or because these species are actively managed by the California Department of Fish and Game outside park boundaries. Park staff cooperate with Fish and Game staff in management of these species within and outside park boundaries.

Of the 45 plant species that occur or have suitable habitat in the parks that are listed by CNPS as species that should be monitored because of rarity or declining populations, RNSP staff monitor the pink sand verbena, Wolf’s evening primrose, Siskiyou checkerbloom, and the maple-leaved checkerbloom. CNPS does not set specific population targets for numbers of individuals but uses the continued presence of these species as an indicator of acceptable population levels. RNSP staff will continue to monitor these species to insure healthy populations exist. Removal of European beach grass from the beaches under the exotic plant species control goal will likely provide additional habitat for the pink sand verbena. Accomplishing this goal will be measured by whether these species remain on the CNPS list and by whether the California Department of Fish and Game continues to assign these species special status in its Natural Diversity Database. This goal will be considered complete when these species are no longer tracked by either CNPS or the Department of Fish and Game.

 

Ia3. Air Quality: Air quality in RNSP has remained stable.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, RNSP continues to meet standards for Class I Air Quality park.

RNSP is a Class I Air Quality area. Because of its location on the Pacific Coast with prevailing winds from the northwest where there are no sources of pollution, RNSP has excellent air quality. Air quality strongly affects the health and condition of natural and cultural resources, including vegetation, wildlife health, viewsheds, and aesthetics. RNSP vegetation management and maintenance division staff monitor fine particulates at the Requa maintenance facility and provide the information to the NPS Air Quality Division, which tabulates and analyzes resulting trends. Other pollutants were monitored as recently as 1995 when the NPS Air Quality Division determined that monitoring effort would be better directed toward parks where air quality was susceptible to changes in pollutant levels.

This goal assumes that air quality will continue to be excellent. Data collected are valuable for monitoring future changes in air quality.

 

Ia4. Water Quality: By September 30, 2005, the impaired water quality of Redwood Creek within park boundaries remains stable.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the impaired water quality of Redwood Creek within park boundaries remains stable

Water quality in Redwood Creek is impaired by past logging and associated road building. The effects of impaired water quality on aquatic and adjacent terrestrial ecosystems were one of the reasons for establishment and expansion of Redwood National Park. The watershed restoration program in Redwood National Park was developed under the 1978 park expansion legislation to correct the erosion and sedimentation problems leading to impaired water quality in Redwood Creek within the national park boundaries. Watershed restoration within the park boundary is reducing erosion and sedimentation from within the park but upstream land uses continue to produce sediment that ends up in the creek.

This goal tracks efforts to monitor water quality and hydrological conditions and restore water quality in Redwood Creek through reduction of sediment sources originating within and outside park boundaries. Efforts directed at restoration of watersheds within RNSP that were disturbed by logging and associated road construction are covered under goal Ia1A–Disturbed Lands.

 

Ia5. Historic Structures: By September 30, 2004, 100% of the historic structures in RNSP on the 1999 List of Classified Structures are in good condition.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 80% of the REDW structures listed on the LCS are in good condition.

Redwood National Park has 25 entries on the List of Classified Structures, including buildings and features associated with the Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, with the Lyons Family Ranches, a World War II facility and early transportation routes. Of the entries, 17 are in fair condition, 7 good and 1 poor. The policy for historic structures in the 1999 GMP/GP is preservation, stabilization, interpretation and, if appropriate, historic leasing. For the most part, work on historic structures will be accomplished by park staff using cultural cyclic maintenance funds. Criteria for determining condition are set through the NPS Cultural Resource program and cover materials, stability, and character of the structures rather than the amount of work needed to maintain the structure. Good condition means that a structure is intact, structurally sound, and performing its intended purpose. Structures in good condition need no major repair, only routine or cyclic maintenance.

 

Ia6. Museum Collections: By September 30, 2005, 227 of 399 preservation and protection standards in RNSP museum collections are achieved.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 223 of 328 (formely 429) of preservation and protection standards in RNSP museum collections are achieved.

In FY2003, the park acquired an estimated 3500 square feet of dedicated space for professional quality, museum storage facilities, along with various specialized storage or curatorial equipment and furnishings. Several museum planning documents, including a museum management plan and collection assessments are currently being drafted. As of FY2003 the baseline number has changed due to the elimination of a storage site. Additionally, since RNSP is a corridor park with some twenty miles distance between offices, satellite museum management facilities are planned for operations at Requa, CBEC, and Hiouchi.

Over the next five years, museum staff will continue extending the development of basic protection to all artifacts, natural history specimens and archival materials.

 

Ia07. Cultural Landscapes: By September 30, 2005, 50% of the cultural landscapes will be in good condition.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 40% of the RNSP cultural landscapes (not on the NPS CLI) are in good condition

The approximately 4500 acres of prairies and oak woodlands of the Bald Hills in the Redwood Creek basin of the park are included in the Lyons Ranches Rural Historic District cultural landscape. These uncommon plant communities are a result of both natural and cultural actions such as fire, gathering, mowing and grazing. Also included in the cultural landscape are archeological sites, ranch structures, roads, fences, water developments, orchards, and other historic features. Preserving this cultural landscape entails: recordation; National Register of Historic Places listing; the drafting of a management plan; implementation of actions such as prescribed burns, gathering, stabilization and preservation of structures, and interpretation.

 

Ia08. Archeological Sites: By September 30, 2005, 50% of the recorded archeological sites in RNSP in the Archeological Sites Management Information System are in good condition.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 40% of the recorded archeological sites in RNSP in the Archeological Sites Management Information System are in good condition.

The preservation of archeological sites and, therefore, keeping them in good condition, entails a number of aspects in addition to data entry. Cultural resources must be inventoried, recorded and evaluated. Next, through compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as documented through programmatic agreements and environmental documents, adverse impacts to these resources are avoided. Training is also a component of the protection of cultural resources. And last, consultations with local Native Americans who have ancestral ties to the historic properties, contribute to the preservation and documentation of the resources.

 

NPS MISSION GOAL Ib: The NPS contributes to knowledge about natural and cultural resources and associated values; management decisions about resources and visitors are based on adequate scholarly and scientific information.

RNSP MISSION GOAL Ib: RNSP staff will acquire baseline inventory data to determine the nature and status of the parks’ natural and cultural resources. The interpretive program will emphasize the development of publications and educational materials for visitors based on the parks’ primary interpretive themes, including cultural resource studies; will support a broad spectrum of diverse educational opportunities at outdoor schools and in local communities; and will develop opportunities for visitors to participate in a variety of interpretive programs and activities to learn more about the parks’ resources and to gain a broad understanding of visitors’ roles in preserving those resources.

 

Ib01(1). Natural Resource Inventories: By September 30, 2005, RNSP has acquired or developed five (5) new data sets needed to determine the status and distribution of biological resources (fauna and flora).

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, RNSP has acquired or developed four (4) new data set needed to determine the status and distribution of biological resources

RNSP staff has begun a program of inventory and monitoring in an effort to provide baseline data necessary to determine the nature and status of the natural resources under RNSP stewardship. To effectively maintain, protect, and restore the natural resources of RNSP, staff will continue to develop new inventory programs, as resources will allow, expanding the existing database.

 

1b2A. Archeological Baseline: By September 30, 2005, 100% of the pertinent RNSP cultural resources data on 100 archeological sites are entered into the NPS Archeological Sites Management Information System (ASMIS) and into the RNSP GIS.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 85% of the data will be entered into ASMIS and GIS

 

There are approximately 100 archeological sites recorded in the national park, the majority of which were recorded and evaluated in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The goal of this project is to both rerecord and reevaluate archeological sites according to current standards and to enter the data into ASMIS and the RNSP GIS. This goal will be accomplished by park staff.

 

1b2B(5). Cultural Landscapes Baseline: By September 30, 2005, 100% (4 of 4) of the cultural landscapes on NPS lands in RNSP have been inventoried, evaluated, and entered in the NPS Cultural Landscapes Inventory at Level II.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, three cultural landscapes in RNSP have been inventoried, evaluated, and entered in the NPS Cultural Landscapes Inventory at Level II.

The cultural landscape inventory (CLI) is needed to establish priorities for protection, restoration, and interpretation of cultural landscapes. The 1999 GMP identifies seven cultural landscapes throughout RNSP potentially eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places: Lyons Ranches Rural Historic District, Bald Hills Archeological District, the site of Radar Station B-71, Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Camp Lincoln, Kelsey Trail, and Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park headquarters complex.

A draft Level 0 cultural landscape inventory (CLI) has been completed for the four cultural landscapes on federal lands in RNSP. The Level 0 inventory was completed without a field visit from a cultural landscape professional. Over the next few years, a cultural landscape specialist will visit the parks to evaluate the landscapes, correct the Level 0 CLI , enter them into the national data base, and draft the Level I CLI. By 2005, the Level II CLI will be completed.

Camp Lincoln and the Kelsey Trail are in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. The NPS is currently working with CDPR to develop a unified cultural resource protection program throughout RNSP. We anticipate that the NPS cultural resource program elements such as CLI will eventually include state park cultural resources and that the subsequent strategic plan revisions will include the 3 state park cultural landscapes identified in the 1999 GMP.

 

Ib2C. Historic Structures Baseline: By September 30, 2005, 100% of the 25 RNSP historic structures on the List of Classified Structures have updated information.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 100% of the REDW entries in the LCS have updated information.

The condition and impact data on the 25 structures on the RNSP LCS need to be updated regularly to have current information used to plan for any repairs or maintenance needed, and to assess any impacts from visitor use. By the end of the planning period, the information on these structures will be current.

 

1b2D. Cultural Resource Baseline–Museum Collections: By September 30, 2005, the number of RNSP museum objects cataloged into the NPS Automated National Catalog System is increased by 35.9% over the 1999 baseline.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the number of RNSP museum objects catalogued into the NPS Automated national Catalog System is increased by 28% over the 1999 baseline.

The RNSP museum collection includes important ethnographic and historical artifacts as well as resource management and research field records and specimens related to understanding coast redwood preservation and its attendant ecosystem. An estimated 370,000 objects need to be accessioned, archivally processed, and cataloged.

In 1999, 105,137 artifacts and museum objects had been cataloged. The Museum Collection Plan calls for the eventual cataloging of a minimum of 124,101 objects by 2005. The park has exceeded this goal every year since FY2000.

 

Ib2E. Cultural Resource Baseline–Ethnographic Resources: By September 30, 2005, the number of RNSP ethnographic resources inventoried, evaluated, and entered on the NPS Ethnographic Resources Inventory is increased from zero in FY1999 to 100%.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 80% of the current recorded park ethnographic resources will be entered on the NPS Ethnographic Resources Inventory.

Several American Indian tribes or groups have traditional ties to park lands. The major extant groups are the Yurok in the southern part of the parks as far north as Wilson Creek, and the Tolowa northward from Wilson Creek. The Hupa to the east of the parks also have ties to RNSP lands through intermarriage with the Chilula, who formerly occupied lands in the Redwood Creek basin within what is now the national park.

The NPS is currently conducting a formal ethnographic overview and traditional use study for the parks. This overview will provide a list of ethnographic resources in the parks, descriptions of their condition, and a discussion of the significance of these resources to groups traditionally associated with them. The ethnographic resource study will assist park managers to protect significance ethnographic resources. It will serve as the basis to encourage visitors to develop a greater appreciation for local American Indian culture through opportunities to observe, experience, and learn about the traditional practices of American Indians.

 

Ib2F. Historical Research Baseline: By September 30, 2005, RNSP will complete an Administrative History to current professional standards and enter it into CRBIB.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, a request will be submitted for CRPP funding to complete the RNSP Administrative History.

Redwood National Park was established and expanded in 1968 and 1978, respectively. It is critical to complete an administrative history before important papers and references are lost or destroyed, and while many of the people involved in early administration are alive to share their knowledge and provide background for the researchers. An administrative history is a valuable management tool to inform future managers of the basis for past decisions and to improve future decision-making.

The history of Redwood National Park establishment and expansion also is important to the management of the entire National Park System through the Redwood Act of 1978 which amended the NPS’ Organic Act. These amendments directed that national park system units be protected, managed, and administered without derogation of the values and purposes for which the units were established.

Of special significance in the administrative history is the establishment of the Redwood National Park watershed restoration program following the 1978 park expansion, and the partnership between the NPS and CDPR for cooperative management of the 4 park units.

 

Ib3. Vital Signs: By September 30, 2005, the vital signs that indicate the health of RNSP ecosystems have been identified, and a monitoring program developed and being used to assess the status and trends of RNSP ecosystems.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the parameters to be monitored as part of the Vital Signs Monitoring Plan will be identified and described.

To be accountable as to whether lands and resources with parks are in a better or worse condition over time, the NPS has adopted the concept of "vital signs" as a framework to assess the condition of park resources. Vital signs are defined as those key resource components necessary for an understanding of overall ecosystem functioning and health. The key components adopted as vital signs provide an adequate set of surrogates within the full range of ecosystem components for the assessment of ecosystem conditions.

RNSP resource management staff held a scoping session in April 1999 as the first step in vital sign identification. This session included outside academic and agency researchers, and NPS staff from other parks familiar with the vital signs program. This group established major ecosystem elements and processes from which vital signs will be selected as terrestrial fauna, terrestrial vegetation, aquatic biota, aquatic habitat, and geologic resources and processes.

 

NPS Goal Category II – PROVIDE FOR PUBLIC ENJOYMENT AND VISITOR EXPERIENCE OF PARKS.

NPS MISSION GOAL IIa: Visitors safely enjoy and are satisfied with the availability, accessibility, diversity, and quality of park facilities, services and appropriate recreational opportunities.

RNSP MISSION GOAL IIa: Visitors of all abilities enjoy RNSP in a safe manner and are satisfied with park facilities including visitor centers, camping and picnicking areas, roads, trails, trailheads, comfort stations, exhibits and kiosks. Visitor sites support and facilitate appropriate public use and enjoyment and participation in a variety of activities related to the full range of RNSP resources. Appropriate recreational opportunities are provided in a variety of settings throughout the parks and managed to protect resources, promote public safety, and minimize public use conflicts. Public and administrative facilities are well-maintained and serve current needs and demands.

 

IIa1(1). Visitor Satisfaction: By September 30, 2005, 91% of park visitors are satisfied with appropriate park facilities, services, and recreational opportunities.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 90% of park visitors are satisfied with appropriate park facilities, services, and recreational opportunities.

NPS visitor evaluations for park facilities, services, and recreational opportunities are important and useful in improving visitor services. Visitor feedback about park facilities, services, and programs for this goal will be accomplished through the Servicewide visitor survey. This survey asks a systematic sample of visitors to evaluate specific aspects of their park visits. The results of visitor feedback methods are used to monitor this goal. The availability of park facilities, services, and recreational opportunities refers to convenient locations and time of operation that fit visitors’ transportation and schedule needs. Accessibility for special populations refers to their accommodation, where appropriate, when visiting the parks. Diversity of facilities and services refers to a range of appropriate accommodations and recreational opportunities for park visitors seeking various park experiences. Quality of facilities and services refers to well-presented, knowledge-based orientation, interpretation and education. Visitors rating the quality of the facilities, services, and recreational opportunities as "good" and "very good" are defined as "satisfied." Significant resources will be expended in protecting all RNSP facilities.

 

IIa2(3). Visitor Safety: By September 30, 2005, the number of visitor accidents/ incidents per 100,000 visitors is reduced by 10% compared to the 1992-1996 baseline.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, visitor accidents/incidents have decreased by 8% compared to the 1992-1996 baseline.

This goal covers a wide variety of activities and efforts in providing the visitor a safe and secure visit. Included are all efforts made to monitor, evaluate and rectify shortcomings found at park facilities. Also included are all efforts expended in providing services to the public that contribute to the safety and security of visitors. Included are protection, search and rescue, emergency medical services, criminal investigation, security, structural/interface firefighting, and all efforts in identifying, investigating, and correcting or mitigating sources of injury and property damage experienced by the visiting public, and educating the public on potential hazards.

 

NPS MISSION GOAL IIb: Park visitors and the general public understand and appreciate the preservation of parks and their resources for this and future generations.

RNSP MISSION GOAL IIb: RNSP visitors, the general public, and our gateway communities and partners understand, appreciate and support the preservation of RNSP and its resources. The cultural connection between the parks’ resources and American Indians will be strengthened by providing opportunities for local American Indians to participate in the management, protection and interpretation of these resources.

A visitor’s park experience and enjoyment of the resources is enhanced by understanding why RNSP exists and what makes the resources significant. RNSP is important not only to the people of the state of California and the United States, but to the people of the world through its designation as a World Heritage Site and an International Biosphere Reserve. RNSP staff work to build support for the parks through educating visitors and guiding them to understand and thus appreciate the purpose and significance of the parks.

These goals also address how we engage the support of gateway communities and the local American Indians for preserving park resources through increasing their understanding of the importance of the parks in a larger context.

 

IIb1(1). Visitor Understanding and Appreciation: By September 30, 2005, 92% of park visitors appreciate and understand the significance of RNSP.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 92% of park visitors appreciate and understand the significance of RNSP.

Visitors' park experiences grow from enjoying RNSP and their resources to understanding why the parks exist and the significance of their resources. Satisfactory visitor experiences build public support for preserving the values contained in RNSP.

This goal measures visitors' comprehension and appreciation of park resources and history. Information, orientation, interpretation, outreach and education are park activities that help visitors discover the most significant meanings to them, in the park. These park activities help visitors to make connections between the tangible natural and cultural resources and the intangible values that reside within the resources. Programming and staffing efforts will focus on increasing field contacts with rangers thus enhancing understanding and appreciation of park values by residents of regional communities as well as national and international visitors. Staff will use the Servicewide survey instrument to measure visitor understanding of the significance of RNSP. This goal also includes all activities involved in working with gateway communities to achieve common goals and objectives pertaining to resource protection, public services, and sustainable economic development.

IIb1X. Educational Programs: By September 30, 2005, 50% of 3rd – 6th grade students who participate in the residential environmental education and the in-classroom outreach programs understand America’s natural and cultural heritage as preserved in RNSP.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 40% of 3rd – 6th grade students who participate in the residential environmental education and the in-classroom outreach programs understand America’s natural and cultural heritage as preserved in RNSP.

Environmental education has been a part of the RNSP core interpretive program for twenty years and will continue to be a primary focus. The NPS has made a significant investment in the construction, and upgrade of two residential outdoor education facilities at Howland Hill and Wolf Creek. The NPS is currently exploring the possibility of operating one of these facilities through a park partner, which would allow the staff to accommodate additional school groups through day-use and in-classroom outreach programs. Reaching the youth is our most effective means of developing long-term understanding and changes in how future visitors responsibly use and care for the parks.

Students will be measured on their understanding of RNSP natural and cultural resources based on the targeted park-related themes for each grade level outlined in the Education Strategy for Redwood National and State Parks.

This goal will be measured through the use of park-produced surveys to students participating in the residential environmental education program and the in-classroom outreach program

NPS Goal Category IV – ENSURE ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

This goal category generally relates to efficient and effective governmental processes rather than to the results of those processes. The long-term goals tied to this mission goal measure work-place standards such as diversity and competency levels, as well as program execution efficiencies. These represent strategies that the park staff has chosen to better accomplish its mission.

NPS MISSION GOAL IVa: The NPS uses current management practices, systems, and technologies to accomplish its mission.

RNSP MISSION GOAL IVa: RNSP staff uses current management practices, systems, and technologies to accomplish the parks’ mission; works cooperatively as a part of a greater National Park System organization, and increases its effectiveness with other agencies, organizations, and individuals.

 

IVa01. Data Systems: By September 30, 2005, 90% of RNSP staff are using the most effective technology to accomplish their job.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 84% of RNSP staff are using the most effective technology to accomplish their job.

By 2004 the park will have 6 local area networks connected to a wide area network (WAN). This will include all offices with 6 or more computers. Smaller offices will have dialup access to the WAN and the internet. Ideally, the park backbone and DOINet connection will be increased from their current speed of 128Kbps to full T1 speed, but this depends on availability and cost of service from local telephone companies. The number of servers will be increased to at least 7 to include a new web server for intranet and internet services. Fax modem sharing will be implemented at headquarters and at the South Operations Center in Orick. The network operating system will be upgraded from Windows NT 4.0 to Windows XP in FY2004. PCs will gradually be migrated to Windows XP with approximately 40% of the park's PC's migrated by 2004. In FY04 Lotus Notes will be phased out and replaced by MS Outlook.

 

IVa3A. Workforce Development and Performance–Performance Plans Linked to Goals: By September 30, 2005, 100% of RNSP employee performance plans are linked to appropriate strategic performance goals and position competencies.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 85% of RNSP employee performance plans are linked to appropriate strategic performance goals and position competencies.

The NPS requires individual performance plans for all employees. Past performance plans have been task statements emphasizing individual outputs rather than individual contributions to the overall NPS mission or organizational outcomes. This goal directly ties individual performance goals to organizational outcomes. The NPS will first develop performance standards incorporating the Strategic Plan results for its senior executives and managers, then expand the process to include performance standards for supervisors and individual employees. This goal will be measured annually by supervisors/managers certifying that performance plans are related to organizational goals set forth in the unit’s strategic plan, by random sample reviews of individual performance plans, and/or by an employee survey instrument that assesses how much employees understand that their work contributes to the successful accomplishment of the organizational mission.

 

IVa4. Workforce Diversity: By September 30, 2005, the NPS permanent workforce at RNSP reflects the percentage of diversity in the regional workforce.

A diverse workforce contributes to the overall health of an organization and furthers cooperation with adjacent communities. The NPS workforce does not reflect the diversity of minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities identified in the civilian labor force figures in certain occupational series. RNSP managers are striving to increase the diversity in the workforce in keeping with the national goal of ensuring organizational effectiveness. RNSP staff is conducting an aggressive outreach program to enhance the diversity of the local staff by recruiting under-represented groups. Servicewide, the NPS has divided the broad goal into more specific goals.

IVa4A. Workforce Diversity: By September 30, 2005, the NPS will increase the representation of underrepresented groups at RNSP over the 1999 baselines by 25% in 5 occupational series: 025–Park Management; 193–Archeology; 301–Administration and Programs; 401–General Biological Science; and 1640–Facility Management.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the NPS will increase the representation of underrepresented groups at RNSP over the 1999 baselines by 20% in 5 designated occupational series.

IVa4B. Workforce Diversity: By September 30, 2005, the NPS will increase the representation of women and minorities in the temporary and seasonal workforce at RNSP over the 1999 baselines by 25%.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the NPS will increase the representation of women and minorities in the temporary and seasonal workforce at RNSP over the 1999 baselines by 20%

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IVa4C. Workforce Diversity: By September 30, 2005, the NPS will increase by 10 % the number of individuals with disabilities in the permanent workforce at RNSP over the 1999 baselines.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the NPS will increase by 8 % the number of individuals with disabilities in the permanent workforce at RNSP over the 1999 baselines.

IVa4D. Workforce Diversity: By September 30, 2005, the NPS will increase by 10 % the number of individuals with disabilities in the seasonal and temporary workforce at RNSP over the 1999 baselines.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the NPS will increase by 8 % the number of individuals with disabilities in the seasonal and temporary workforce at RNSP over the 1999 baselines.

An individual with a disability is defined as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment. Major life activities are activities that an average person can perform such as walking, seeing, breathing, hearing, learning, or working.

IVa5. Employee Housing: By September 30, 2005, 50% of employees housing units listed in poor or fair condition in 1997 assessment are rehabilitated to good condition, replaced, or removed.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, 40% of employees housing units listed in poor or fair condition in 1997 assessment are rehabilitated to good condition, replaced, or removed.

 

RNSP employees generally live in local communities rather than in park housing. Some park housing was acquired when the national park was established or expanded over 30 years ago. This housing needs repair, replacement with modern features and materials, or remodeling to current standards. Some acquired housing is in such poor or unsafe condition that it is being disposed of, and the sites restored to natural conditions. In-park housing is provided only for those employees needed to provide emergency services to the public or to protect RNSP resources and facilities. Otherwise, housing is provided only for seasonal staff and volunteers essential to managing and protecting the parks. Because there is more demand than available housing, the RNSP housing officer assigns housing under a priority system. The NPS maintenance division is actively involved in the servicewide program to assess the condition of housing throughout the NPS. This participation increases park management’s ability to determine the condition of RNSP housing relative to other parks. This goal is measured by the number of housing units that are in good condition, repaired or replaced by 2005.

 

IVa6A. Employee Safety: By September 30, 2005, lost-time injury rate at RNSP will be at or below 5.39 per 200,000 labor hours worked (100 FTE).

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, there is a 50% decrease in employee on-the-job injuries/illnesses compared to 1997.

The National Park Service has the worst safety record in the Department of the Interior and one of the worst in the Federal Government. In 1999, the RNSP rate was 6.67 per 200,000 hours worked. Park management is aggressively pursuing a comprehensive program to reduce the injury rate, through training, review of incidents, correction of safety deficiencies, and personal responsibility and commitment to safety. DuPont Corporation was contracted to review park procedures and activities in FY01 and the park is making substantial progress in implementing the recommendations made by DuPont specific to RNSP programs. By the end of the life of this strategic plan, the NPS expects a substantial decrease in the lost-time injury rate at RNSP.

 

IVa6B. Employee Safety–COP Hours: By September 30, 2005, RNSP total number of hours of Continuation of Pay (COP) will be at or below 380 hours per year.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, RNSP total number of hours of COP will be reduced by 15% compared to FY00.

Continuation-of-Pay (COP) hours are hours paid to an employee who misses work due to on-the-job illnesses or injuries. This goal tracks NPS efforts to reduce the work hours lost following on-the-job employee injuries or illnesses, which costs the NPS because an employee cannot perform work but continues to be paid. RNSP managers attempt to find suitable work in the park for an ill or injured employee during recovery from illness or injury, if approved by a health care provider, as part of the total park safety program. For example, an employee may be able to work part-time or may be assigned work that is physically less demanding than normal job assignments. In FY00, RNSP had a total of 152 hours of COP.

 

IVa06A. Property Loss/Damage: By September 30, 2005, the cost of lost or damaged government property has decreased 25% compared to 1992/1997 average losses

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the cost of lost or damaged government property has decreased 20% compared to 1992/1997 average losses.

All RNSP employees performing property management functions must have a clear understanding of their responsibilities as they relate to property functions such as maintenance, accountability, inventory, and training on the proper use of individual pieces of equipment. The purpose for a property management program is to protect RNSP employees, as well as park assets, and to prevent losses, theft of, or damage to, park equipment and property. Personnel responsible for property management functions are held accountable and financially liable for any missing, lost or damaged property, if such loss was the result of simple or gross negligence or neglect; or was the result of failure to install such management controls as necessary as required to ensure the safeguarding and maintenance of RNSP property under their control.

As part of the total safety and risk management program at RNSP, losses and damages to government property and equipment are tracked under this goal through review of the park’s annual inventory records and activities of the Board of Survey.

 

IVb1. Volunteer Hours: By September 30, 2005, the number of volunteer hours will have increased 10% above the 22,500 hours in 1997.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the number of volunteer hours will have increased 8% above the 1997 baseline.

Redwood National & State Parks has the largest international volunteer program in the NPS. Park volunteers provide various kinds of assistance from maintenance and interpretation to administration and collection management. The NPS Volunteers in Parks (VIP) program, authorized in 1970, allows the NPS to accept and use voluntary help in ways mutually beneficial to the parks and the volunteers. Government downsizing has increased the demand for additional volunteers and funding.

 

IVb2A. Donations and Grants: Cash donations are increased by 3.5 % over donations collected in 1998.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, cash donations are increased by 3.0% over the 1998 baseline.

As the NPS continues to experience a widening gap between funded and unfunded needs at RNSP, the ability to stimulate additional dollars through donations and grants becomes increasingly important. Appropriated dollars are inadequate to address needed rehabilitation of disturbed lands, maintenance and upgrade of park facilities or visitor use and education and fall far short of addressing the growing demand for new services and programs. This goal will increase donations and grants in support of priority unfunded needs.

 

IVb2C. Cooperating Associations: By September 30, 2005, the value of donations, grants, and services from the Redwood Natural History Association is maintained at 1998 levels.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, resources are shared between parks and park priorities reflect needs regardless of state or federal ownership.

In April 1994 the NPS entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with CDPR and Recreation for the cooperative management of all parks within the national park boundary. Pursuant to P.L. 105-83, Fy 98 Interior Appropriations Act, the Secretary of the Interior was authorized to enter into agreements with the State of California for the cooperative management of Redwood National Park and proximate state lands. The purpose of such agreements was to acquire from and provide to the State of California goods and services to be used by the Secretary and the State of California in cooperative management of lands if the Secretary determines that appropriations for that purpose are available and an agreement is in the best interest of the United States. In April, 1999, a new agreement was entered into by the two parties due to their desire to renew and strengthen the agreement to provide for continued cooperative of all CDPR and NPS lands within the congressionally authorized boundary of Redwood National Park.

 

IVbX. Park Partnerships: By September 30, 2005, the number of projects satisfactorily completed by partners under formal agreements that protect park resources or serves the park visitors is increased by 5%.

Annual Goal: By September 30, 2004, the number of projects satisfactorily completed by partners under formal agreements that protect park resources or serve the park visitors is increased by 4%.

This goal tracks the number of projects completed inside RNSP boundaries that are conducted by park partners in cooperation with park staff. These projects are all conducted under long-term formal agreements with the non-NPS agency. Long-term agreements include cooperative agreements, interagency agreements, and memoranda of understanding or agreement. Some of these agreements involve exchange of funds, but most involve personnel working on projects that benefit park resources.

This goal covers projects that protect NPS resources completed by two major partners– CDPR and the Yurok Tribe. Memoranda of Understanding for these partners were first developed in 1994 and 1996, respectively, and are expected to be renewed well beyond the life of this strategic plan. These are broad partnerships that include many management activities in RNSP. The CDPR partnership covers all aspects of park management including interpretation, maintenance, resource management, visitor and resource protection, and administration. The partnership with the Yurok Tribe is in its early stages, and a number of resource management and interpretation projects are being developed. Projects undertaken with the Yurok Tribe include interpretation of Yurok culture and traditions for visitors; watershed and vegetation management; identification of ethnographic resources and traditional cultural properties; and protection and adaptive use of historic structures.

Numerous resource management projects are conducted under agreements with the California Conservation Corps; Pacific Coast Fish, Wildlife, and Wetlands Restoration Association; the Environmental Protection Agency; the USDA Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service; the US Geological Survey; the California Department of Fish and Game; the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection; and the Humboldt Resource Conservation District.

In FY 2000, resource management projects completed or on-going in partnership with the above agencies include stream gaging work conducted with the US Geological Survey; development of GIS themes for threatened and endangered species done in association with the US Fish and Wildlife Service; two vegetation management projects (European beach grass removal and oak-woodland restoration) conducted with California Conservation Corps; and prescribed burns conducted in cooperation with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Other agreements govern projects in maintenance, interpretation, and visitor services and resource protection. These projects include highway maintenance and resource protection associated with Highway 101 through the park conducted in cooperation with the California Department of Transportation; emergency medical and fire protection services provided cooperatively with the Orick Community Services District; and interpretive and resource management projects conducted with the Student Conservation Association.

VI ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN PREPARERS

Bill Pierce: Superintendent, RNSP

Amy A. Caldwell: Chief of Administration, RNSP

Jeff Denny: Chief of Interpretation, RNSP

Scott A. Wanek: Chief of Visitor Services & Protection, RNSP

Raymond Cozby: Chief of Maintenance, RNSP

Terrence D. Hofstra: Chief of Resource Mgmt & Science, RNSP

Aida M. Parkinson Environmental Specialist, RNSP