Home 

  Background

  Study Area

  Study Process

  Frequently-
  Asked Questions

  Get Involved!

  Newsletters /   Boletines
  informativos

  Contact Us

San Gabriel Watershed and Mountains
Special Resource Study

Study Area

What does it mean to be in a study area? The study area is not a proposal for a national park. It is simply an area in which the National Park Service is asked to evaluate resources. As the study team learns about resources in the study area, the focus of the study becomes narrower. For example, the study team may find that there are several small areas such as a section of a river or a historic building that are eligible for NPS designation or assistance. Once significant resources are identified, the NPS will explore a range of options or alternatives to protect these resources and provide for public enjoyment. These alternatives may focus on specific historic sites, creeks or trail/open space corridors with exceptional resource values. These alternatives will emphasize collaborative efforts and will respect property rights and the authorities that currently belong to existing local, state and federal agencies and jurisdictions.

A general boundary of the study area is described in the authorizing legislation. The study area covers more than 1,000 square miles, or 700,000 acres. The United States Forest Service manages approximately 2/3 of the study area in the San Gabriel Mountains as part of the Angeles National Forest. Most of the study area is located in Los Angeles County, with small portions in Orange and San Bernardino counties. While much of the study area lies within the SanGabriel River watershed, portions of the Los Angeles River, the Santa Clara River and the Antelope Valley watersheds are also included.

The diverse study area landscape contains mountains, valleys, wildlands, and urban areas. The San Gabriel Mountains foothills function as the urban/wildlife interface, and provide wildlife connections to river corridors. Although portions of the San Gabriel River and its tributaries have been altered for flood protection and water conservation, these urbanized channels still serve as habitat for wildlife and often provide opportunities for recreation.

The NPS has revised the study area based on analysis of the intent of Congress, public comments, ecological systems, recreational opportunities and important natural and cultural resources. The revisions include a different definition of the southern edge of the study area, and additions around the Rio Hondo Channel, Santa Anita Wash and Sawpit Wash.

MAPS:

Study Area

full size jpg file

print resolution pdf

Communities

full size jpg file

pdf file

Watersheds

full size jpg file

pdf file

Topography

full size jpg file

pdf file

updated 07/31/09