Rosie the Riveter: Women Working During World War II

Home

History

Women's Stories

Women's Photos

Women'sArtifacts

Credits

 
Previous Artifacts

 

Employee Papers

12

“Notification of Rate, Classification or Merit Status”; #1 is a Merit Increase notice and #2 is a Reclassification notice. Donated by Johnny Parris, accession 121. Evelyn DeLong Parris, donor’s mother, was an assembler and riveter at Bell Aircraft in Marietta, GA for 2 years. Size of both: 5”x8”.

 

“Notice of Official Efficiency Rating”; a rating of Good for 1944. Donated by Eleanor M. Plotner, accession 255. Eleanor M. Sansone, donor’s mother, was an inspector at High Standard Mfg. Co. in New Haven, CT and Springfield, MA between 1942-1945. Size: 5”x7”.

 

1 2

“Notice of Personnel Action”; #1 indicates Eleanor being hired and #2 indicates Eleanor being laid off. Donated by Eleanor M. Plotner, accession 255. Eleanor M. Sansone, donor’s mother, was an inspector at High Standard Mfg. Co. in New Haven, CT and Springfield, MA between 1942-1945. Size of both: 10”x6.5”.

 

1 2

“Notification of Personnel Action”; Louise was promoted and then reassigned. Donated by Lyla Yaroshak, accession 313. Louise Helen Meisner, donor’s mother, was a “b” mechanic on the wing assembly at Boeing for 2 years, and then an A.C. service mechanic at the Spokane Army Airbase for 1 year. Size of both: 10”x6”.

 

“Notice of Separation”; for other reasons, family. Donated by Verta Jean Chandler, accession 191. Verta was a riveter “b” at North American Aviation Inc. in Kansas City, KS between 1943-1944, and then a lathe operator at Manning Brothers in Glendale, CA between 1944-1945. Size: 4”x7”.

 

“Notice of Termination”; Olga was laid off at the end of the war. Donated by Olga May Schwender, accession 172. Olga was an assembly mechanic – “A” leader at Columbia Aircraft in Portland, OR for 3 ½ years. Size: 4”x5.5”.

 

 

Paperwork has always been a part of the American workplace. While many employees find it tiresome, it is important and creates a record of past actions. Some women saved their paperwork from World War II because it was important to them and represented the work they did on the homefront. The artifacts in this section range from merit-based pay increases to notice of termination forms.

 

Previous Artifacts