• The Sacred Hale o Keawe Heiau Protects the Pu'uhonua

    Pu`uhonua O Hōnaunau

    National Historical Park Hawai'i

Fees & Reservations

A park visitor is greeted at the entrance station.

A park ranger greets a visitor, receives their fee and introduces them to the pu‘uhonua.

Fees assist the park in providing educational and cultural programs. Fees also fund projects which continue the preservation of Hawaiian culture.

 
Park Entrance Fees:

$5.00 per vehicle - 7 days

$3.00 per individual - 7 days

$25.00 Tri-park Annual Pass


Vehicle

$5.00 - 7 days

Admits one single, private, non-commercial vehicle and all of its passengers (up to 8 persons). Organized non-profit groups (service organizations, scouts, church groups, college/school clubs) are not eligible for the $5.00 vehicle permit if utilized.

Individual

$3.00 - 7 days

Admits one individual when entering by foot, bicycle, or motorcycle. Individuals 15 years old and younger are admitted free of charge.

Hawai`i Tri-park Annual Pass

$25.00 - Annual

Allows access for 1 full year from date of first use at Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park and Hawai`i Volcanoes and Haleakala National Parks.


other National Park passes and more...


Commercial Tours


To operate a business, profit or non-profit, the park requires a Commercial Use Authorization (formally known as Incidental Business Permit). All commercial tours that enter the park on a regular basis must have a CUA and are required to pay the commercial tour fee at the entrance station on each visit. more…

Educational Fee Waiver

Academic institutions may be eligible for a fee waiver. more...

 

2014 Fee Free Days:

The following days have been designated as fee FREE days for 2014 (entrance fee will be waived):

January 20
(Martin Luther King, Jr. Day)

February 15-17
(Presidents Day weekend)

April 19-20
(opening weekend of National Park Week)

August 25
(National Park Service Birthday)

September 27
(National Public Lands Day)

November 11
(Veterans Day)

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

In 1778 Captain Cook visited the Kealakekua bay area and perished in a struggle with the native people over a stolen row boat.