• The Sacred Hale o Keawe Heiau Protects the Pu'uhonua

    Pu`uhonua O Hōnaunau

    National Historical Park Hawai'i

‘Āle‘ale‘a Heiau

‘Āle‘ale‘a Heiau in the early 1900's

‘Āle‘ale‘a Heiau in the early 1900’s, note the steps in the south wall and the Ka‘ahumanu Stone in the foreground.

PUHO Archives

This large platform is located centrally within the Pu'uhonua. The first written descriptions of the heiau were recorded by William Ellis. Ellis indicates that at the time of his visit in 1823 the structure was largely intact. Subsequent to his visit, periods of high surf and at least one large tsunami took a significant toll on the condition of the heiau. The platform was restored in 1902 under the direction of William Wright who also added steps in the southern wall for the convenience of the visitors.

 
1963 Alealea Stabilization

‘Āle‘ale‘a Heiau during the 1963 stabilization.

NPS Photo

When the park was formed in the early 1960's 'Āle'ale'a Heiau was found to be structurally weak and in need of repair. In 1963, Edmund J. Ladd oversaw test excavations and stabilization at the site. Ladd's excavations led to the discovery of a complex of internal walls, interpreted by Ladd as representing earlier constructions phases. Seven chronological construction phases were identified.

Originally, the heiau was likely constructed in association with the Pu'uhonua, but later tradition indicates that it was a temple for pleasure, where chiefs of a particular lineage would relax and watch hula. Traditional accounts also indicate that access to the platform's surface was formerly made using a kauila wood ladder that was reserved for the exclusive use of the chiefs.

Did You Know?

noni tree

Did you know that the noni tree was brought to Hawai'i by the early Polynesian settlers and was used as a medicinal tonic to treat digestive problems. Today, noni juice can be purchased in many health food stores throughout the country.