• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

National Public Lands Day 2013

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Point Reyes National Seashore will host a couple events in recognition of National Public Lands Day 2013. The public is invited to join us on Sunday, September 29 for a Habitat Restoration Project workday. Additionally, we will offer the opportunity to experience tule elk during the rut (mating season) with our volunteer Tule Elk Docents on both Saturday and Sunday, September 28 and 29.

National Public Lands Day (usually observed on the fourth Saturday of September) is an annual event designed to encourage people to get outside and visit places such as Point Reyes National Seashore. National Public Lands Day is also a national volunteer effort to encourage folks to give back to the very lands we use to hike, bike, swim, explore, picnic, or just relax. It is the nation's largest hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance the public lands!

National Public Lands Day began in 1994 with three federal agencies and 700 volunteers. In 2012, about 175,000 volunteers worked at 2,206 sites in every state, the District of Columbia, and in many U.S. territories. 2012 was the biggest National Public Lands Day in the history of the event. 2013 will be the 20th Anniversary of National Public Lands Day. Now, eight federal agencies and many state and local lands participate in this annual day of caring for shared lands.

Below is a listing of events that were held at Point Reyes National Seashore on or in conjunction with the 2013 National Public Lands Day. All events were co-hosted by Point Reyes National Seashore Association.

 
Tule Elk Docents with visitors at Windy Gap, Tomales Point, Point Reyes National Seashore

Tule Elk Docents with visitors at Windy Gap on Tomales Point

Event: Experience Tule Elk
Date: Saturday & Sunday, September 28 & 29, 2013
Location: Tomales Point

Every summer, visitors have the opportunity to see the tule elk during the rut (mating season) weekends and holidays July through September, weather permitting. Docents are stationed at the Tomales Point Trailhead from ~10:30 am to 4 pm and at Windy Gap (1 mile north along the Tomales Point Trail) from ~11 am to 3:30 pm. Visitors have the opportunity to interact with volunteer docents who have binoculars and spotting scopes to allow visitors to observe elk rut behaviors.

 
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Volunteers removing cape ivy.

Event: Habitat Restoration Workday
Date: Sunday, September 29, 2013
Time: 9 am to 1 pm

Join the Habitat Restoration Program at Point Reyes National Seashore on Sunday, September 29 to help protect and restore endangered plant and wildlife habitat at Abbott's Lagoon. Visit one of the most beautiful areas in the park and learn about local plant ecology while you work alongside park staff to carry out ecological restoration projects. Get involved, meet new people, and make a positive impact on your environment!

We will be removing small patches of iceplant and European beachgrass from restored dunes that support the threatened Western Snowy Plover. The worksite is reached by a hike of about 1.5 miles on the Abbott's Lagoon trail and in sand. Participants are advised to wear warm and wind-stopping layers, long pants, knee pads, sturdy shoes and other seasonally appropriate clothing, as well as bring plenty of water, lunch and snacks. No shorts or open-toed shoes. Training, tools, and gloves will be provided.

The workday will be held if at least four volunteers confirm participation. Please confirm participation by 3:30 pm on Thursday, September 26 by contacting Ellen Hamingson at 415-464-5196 or by email. We will meet at 9 am in front of the Bear Valley Visitor Center, carpool or caravan to the Abbott's trailhead, and work until 1 pm. Volunteers are welcome to eat lunch with the group on-site at 1 pm.

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