• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • 2014 Harbor Seal Pupping Season Closures

    From March 1 through June 30, the park implements closures of certain Tomales Bay beaches and Drakes Estero to water-based recreation to protect harbor seals during the pupping season. Please avoid disturbing seals to ensure a successful pupping season. More »

  • 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus Operations Have Ended

    March 30, 2014, was the last day for the 2014 Winter Shuttle Bus System. Sir Francis Drake Blvd. is open daily from now through late December 2014. More »

  • Operational Changes Took Effect on May 1, 2013

    The Lighthouse Visitor Center is now only open Fridays through Mondays; closed Tuesdays through Thursdays, including Thanksgiving. The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center is open on weekends and holidays when shuttles are operating. More »

Press Kit: Park Significance

Point Reyes National Seashore provides essential habitat for 27 threatened and endangered species and a variety of rare or recovering species including the tule elk, California red-legged frog, Sonoma spineflower, northern elephant seal, coho salmon, and western snowy plover.

The convergence of two ecological provinces and the coastal/marine margin at Point Reyes creates a rich biological diversity and abundance of plants and animals seen few places on earth.

The peninsula's rich and varied natural resources -- its estuaries, coastal grasslands, salt marshes, coniferous forests, and marine environment -- have attracted and supported people for over 5000 years and reflect a continuum of human use and changing land-use values.

Point Reyes National Seashore is a 70,000-acre recreational and inspirational haven consisting of 80 miles of wild, undeveloped coastline located just an hour's drive from an urban area populated by over seven million people.

The diversity and complexity of the natural and cultural resources found in and around Point Reyes National Seashore make it a world-class laboratory and outdoor classroom providing outstanding opportunities for hands-on education and long-term scientific research.

Point Reyes National Seashore is one of the finest examples of how plate tectonics and other geologic processes continue to define our landscapes and our lives.

The coastal weather and the Point Reyes Peninsula create such a hazard for area mariners that the Point Reyes Lighthouse, with its first-order Fresnel lens, and a Coast Guard lifesaving station were built here.

The natural and cultural resources of the Point Reyes Peninsula and the surrounding area are so rare, valuable, and inspirational to all the people of the world that the United Nations declared the Seashore an International Biosphere Reserve, known as the Central California Coast Biosphere Reserve.

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Did You Know?

Elephant seals at the main colony at Point Reyes

Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) began breeding at Point Reyes in 1981 after being absent for over 150 years. The population breeds at terrestrial haul out sites at Point Reyes Headland, one of only eleven mainland breeding areas for northern elephant seals in the world. More...