• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Point Reyes National Seashore Storm Update - February 27, 1998

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Date: February 27, 1998
Contact: John Dell'Osso, 415-464-5135

The majority of the Point Reyes National Seashore will reopen this coming weekend. After two weeks of nearly continuous storms, emergency crews this week have made substantial progress repairing storm damage throughout the park.

The main access to Limantour Beach, after being closed for two weeks, will reopen on February 27, 1998. After temporary repairs, Federal Highway Administration and National Park Service engineers have determined the road can be reopened and major repairs will occur later this year.

Some of the most popular trails at Point Reyes National Seashore will reopen. Those trails or sections of trails include Bear Valley, Coast, Stewart, Cross Marin Trail, Bolinas Ridge Trail, Randall Trail, and McCurdy Trail.

Coast and Sky campgrounds will reopen this weekend while Wildcat and Glen campgrounds will remain closed through this weekend. The Point Reyes Hostel will also reopen for public use.

Many facilities within the Seashore continue to remain open to the public. Those include: the Bear Valley Visitor Center, Earthquake Trail, Drakes Beach and the Ken Patrick Visitor Center, the Point Reyes Lighthouse and visitor center, North Beach, South Beach, Kehoe Beach. Adjacent state parks, Tomales Bay and Samuel P. Taylor, continue to remain open to the public.

Superintendent Don Neubacher stated, “Emergency crews from Yosemite and Sequoia Kings Canyon National Parks, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Point Reyes National Seashore did a tremendous job to ensure the majority of the park can be reopened to the public.”

Point Reyes National Seashore has received over 60 inches of rain this year. Of this total, 24 inches of rain came during the month of February. Park visitors are cautioned to be careful when hiking trails because of heavy flows in streams, downed trees, muddy conditions, and unstable slopes. Also, park visitors are asked not to enter closed areas because of safety concerns.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Deathcap Mushrooms © John Lennie

Deathcap mushrooms are found throughout the Point Reyes region and are the most poisonous mushrooms in the world. But they're fairly new arrivals here. They invaded the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1930s, likely brought over on cork trees from Europe for the wine industry. More...