• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Flood Damage and Closures Due to New Years 1997 Storm at Point Reyes National Seashore

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Date: January 2, 1997
Contact: John Dell’Osso, 415-464-5135

Due to the recent heavy rainfall, a portion of Sir Francis Drake Highway north of Inverness has failed due to a major landslide. Because Sir Francis Drake is the only major access road, all public access to the northern district of Point Reyes National Seashore will be closed until further notice. Drakes Beach, the Point Reyes Lighthouse, and other popular locations will not be open until Marin County Public Works officials can determine the proper stabilization and rehabilitation for that portion of road. The section of the road that failed is approximately 100 feet in length. The landslide traveled approximately 300 feet down the steep edge of the road.

The southern section of the National Seashore will remain open including Bear Valley, Limantour Beach, Five Brooks, Olema Valley, many hiking trails, and the Palomarin Area. The main park visitor center at Bear Valley will also remain open to the public. Facilities in the north district that will remain closed include the Historic Point Reyes Lighthouse and visitor center, the Ken Patrick Visitor Center at Drakes Beach, as well as beach access to McClures, Kehoe, Abbotts Lagoon, North, South, and Drakes.

Superintendent Don Neubacher stated, "We will work cooperatively with Marin County officials to reopen this section of road as quickly as possible." In addition, he expressed "the major southern section of the park will remain open. The public should exercise caution until the weather improves." For updated closure information, the public should call (415) 663-1092, ext. 403.

-NPS-

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