• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

Coastal Dune Restoration Project: Coastal Dune Environmental Assessment - Compliance Documents

 

In 2009, the National Park Service completed an Environment Assessment (EA) (4,607 KB PDF) for the Abbotts Lagoon Coastal Dune Restoration Project. The Seashore desired to build upon the EA that was prepared for the Abbott's Lagoon Coastal Dune Restoration Project and expand the scope of its analysis to cover potential restoration efforts in other dune areas throughout the park. A new National Environmental Policy Act process was initiated in 2012 to develop a new programmatic EA to incorporate the public scoping and analysis information gathered and included in the earlier 2009 document. The information was updated to reflect advances in knowledge or restoration methods, as well as additional concerns or issues raised by the public.

Public scoping is designed to obtain public input on issues and areas of concern related to the project, including a suitable range of alternatives, the impact topics that should be incorporated, the nature and extent of potential environmental impacts and benefits, and appropriate mitigation strategies. The scoping effort of 2012–2013 was intended to build upon earlier scoping efforts conducted as part of the Abbott's Lagoon Coastal Dune Restoration Project.

Impact topics that were evaluated as part of this programmatic EA include: vegetation, species of special concern, wildlife, soils and sand movement, water resources, soundscape, cultural and historic resources, visitor experience, neighboring land use, health and safety, wilderness, and park operations and management.

This programmatic EA evaluated a broad range of removal strategies for non-native, invasive plant species such as European beachgrass and iceplant. The latest information from dune restoration efforts in the Seashore and in other West Coast dune systems was used to ensure that methodologies selected for evaluation in this EA are current and up-to-date in terms of any technical advances in technical approach. Manual, chemical, and mechanical removal strategies were assessed and some of the alternatives may incorporate a combination of methodologies, as the 2009 EA did. Any restoration work will be accomplished within the constraints imposed by laws, policies, and sound best management practices.

As part of this planning process, we welcomed comments from the public regarding the range of suitable alternatives, applicable impact topics, and potential impacts and benefits. The preferred method for submitting comments was via the internet through the NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment site at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/pore, although comments delivered by mail or hand-delivered were also accepted.

Comments were not accepted by FAX, e-mail, or in any other way than those specified above. Bulk comments in any format (hard copy or electronic) submitted on behalf of others were not accepted. Those submitting comments were warned that their entire comment--including their personal identifying information--may be made publicly available at any time. While one could ask the NPS in a comment to withhold personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

The comment period closed on January 15, 2013.

Letter to Interested Parties - December 6, 2012 (26 KB PDF)

Extent of Invasive Plants in Seashore (1241 KB PDF)


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