• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • Bear Valley Visitor Center Lighting Retrofit:

    Due to safety concerns during the installation of new LED lights, sections of the Bear Valley Visitor Center's exhibit area may be closed through the end of July. More »

  • The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center will be closed on Saturday, July 16.

    We are sorry for any inconvenience, but the Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center at Drakes Beach will be closed on Saturday, July 16. It will open at 10 am on Sunday, July 17.

Fire Suppression

Smoke behind trees as firefighter responds to a lightning-ignited wildfire
Suppression action being taken on a lightning ignited fire in October 2004.
NPS Photo by Brian Kruger
 

All unplanned wildland fires at Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) receive aggressive initial attack action by the nearest available suppression forces. Initial attack is an aggressive suppression action consistent with firefighter and public safety and values to be protected.

Fire suppression resources at Point Reyes National Seashore include:

1 Type 3 engine
1 Type 6 engine
1 Hazardous Fuel Module (8-10 person crew)

Through a Memorandum of Understanding, Marin County Fire Department and other West Marin fire agencies have also been authorized to undertake initial attack actions on PRNS lands. This allows cooperating fire agencies to assume authority for initial attack until a qualified federal Incident Commander and personnel arrive to establish Unified Command of the incident.

Cooperating Agencies

Marin County Fire Department
Bolinas Fire Protection District
Inverness Public Utility District
Nicasio Volunteer Fire Department
California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection

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Did You Know?

Bull elephant seal © Richard Allen

Four species of pinnipeds (seals and sea lions) rest onshore or breed at Point Reyes: the Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), the harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), and the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus). More...