• The Point Reyes Beach as viewed from the Point Reyes Headlands

    Point Reyes

    National Seashore California

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  • Bear Valley Visitor Center Lighting Retrofit:

    Due to safety concerns during the installation of new LED lights, sections of the Bear Valley Visitor Center's exhibit area may be closed through the end of July. More »

  • The Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center will be closed on Saturday, July 16.

    We are sorry for any inconvenience, but the Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center at Drakes Beach will be closed on Saturday, July 16. It will open at 10 am on Sunday, July 17.

Coastal Dunes

diverse coastal dune habitat at Abbotts Lagoon
 

The coastal dunes rise above the reach of the highest tides. When strong winds pelt you with sand at the Point Reyes beach, you can leave. The plants here can’t. They tough out growing on our wild shore with special adaptations. To keep from being completely buried by sand, beach strawberry and beach morning glory can grow up new shoots from horizontal underground stems. The sand has few nutrients available for plants, so dune lupine allows special bacteria into its roots that converts nitrogen in the soil into a form plants can use. Grasses are particularly good at conserving water in their leaves, perhaps too good. Much of the grass you see is invasive. European beachgrass is a highly invasive grass that has taken over vast tracts of dunes. Iceplant, native to South Africa, has likewise colonized a large portion of our dunes. Its fleshy leaves prevent water loss and help it outcompete native vegetation. At Abbotts Lagoon, the park removed 50 acres of these and other invasive plants, and now the endangered beach layia and Tidestrom's lupine are growing there.

Learn more at sfnps.org's Coastal Dunes page and Coastal Dunes image gallery.

Learn more about the Fire Ecology of Coastal Dunes.

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Did You Know?

Climate scientists warn that the safe upper limit for atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations is 350 parts per million.

Climate scientists warn that the safe upper limit for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations is 350 parts per million (ppm). For most of human history, atmospheric CO2 rarely exceeded 275 ppm--until the industrial revolution. As of 2013, atmospheric CO2 was ~400 ppm–-and rising 2 ppm/year. More...