• Paddling on the Potomac River

    Potomac Heritage

    National Scenic Trail DC,MD,PA,VA

Explore the Trail Network

The Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail is a diverse, braided network of trails and routes within portions of five geographic areas. The links below take you to the primary Web sites for each Trail network segment.

· the 70-mile Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail, within Laurel Ridge State Park

· 74 miles of the Great Allegheny Passage between Ohiopyle and Cumberland, managed by a coalition of organizations and agencies

· the 184.5-mile Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Towpath within Chesapeake and Ohio National Historical Park

· a 15-mile linear park system in Loudoun County, VA

· 7.7 miles of trails within Riverbend Park, Great Falls Park and Scott's Run Nature Preserve in northern Fairfax County, VA

· two partially-completed routes within the District of Columbia-the 23-mile Fort Circle Parks Trail, part of the Civil War Defenses of Washington, and a multi-use route between Georgetown and Oxon Cove Park

· the 18.5-mile Mount Vernon Trail and the 10-mile Potomac Heritage Trail within George Washington Memorial Parkway

· a 27-mile Potomac Heritage Trail On-Road Bicycling Route in Prince Georges County, MD

· a one-mile trail along the north shore of Piscataway Creek in Piscataway Park

· a two-mile route within Nanjemoy Natural Resource Management Area, Charles County, MD

· the Southern Maryland Potomac Heritage Trail Bicycling Route in Charles and Saint Mary's counties

· two 4.5-mile routes in Prince William Forest Park and a partially-completed 8-mile route, between Leesylvania State Park and Belmont Bay, in Prince William County

· the Government Island Trail, the planned five-mile Historic Falmouth-Ferry Farm Trail, and the Aquia Creek Water Trail in Stafford County, VA

· the Northern Neck Heritage Trail Bicycling Route Network in the four-county area of Westmoreland, Northumberland, Lancaster and Richmond (Virginia)

Additional Trail segments, particularly those that eliminate gaps and contribute to a continuous network, can be recognized in the future.

Did You Know?

whitetail deer

The whitetail deer has a vertical leap of nine feet! This is a handy skill to have when eluding predators. How high can you jump?