• Paddling on the Potomac River

    Potomac Heritage

    National Scenic Trail DC,MD,PA,VA

Plan Your Visit

two bicyclists enjoy the view from the bridge over the Youghiogheny River near Ohiopyle, Pennsylvania

The Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail is a diverse network of trails and routes embracing portions of five geographic provinces and two major watersheds. The "Things to Do" section includes links to explore the Trail network.

Hiking opportunities are extensive and one of the best ways to experience the beauty, history and culture of the Trail network. Click here to reach a digital edition of Potomac Heritage Trail: A Hiker's Guide; developed with assistance from the American Hiking Society, the guide includes descriptions of places and practical information to help plan day trips, overnight hikes and, for those with more time, the length of the Trail corridor. Please contact us if you've completed a through-hike or all sections (e.g., travel between Point Lookout, Md. or Smith Point, Vir., and Seward or Point State Park, Penn.)--we'd like to learn from you.

Bicycling opportunities are many, including the marked Northern Neck Heritage Trail, the Southern Maryland PHT route, the Mount Vernon Trail, the C & O Canal Towpath and the Great Allegheny Passage; see Maps page for more information and contact Adventure Cycling Association for a set of "Tidewater Potomac Heritage" bicycling route maps. For a draft set of cue sheets between Arlington Memorial Bridge and Reedville, VA, click here.

Paddling the Potomac and Youghiogheny rivers, as well as their tributaries, often provides intimate connections with natural areas and unique perspectives on urban environments. Click here to reach a set of pages on water trails, developed in 2012 with the assistance of the River Management Society.

Cross-country skiing is a popular winter activity in some portions of the Trail corridor. Click here for a two-page list of places to go.

 

Did You Know?

Moncacy Aqueduct along C&O Canal

Aqueducts are water filled bridges. Of the 11 aqueducts built along the canal, the Monocacy Aqueduct is the longest at 516 feet, its seven arches constructed mainly of stone quarried from nearby Sugarloaf Mountain.