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Industrial Leadership For The Preservation of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants

Symposium 2002: Are you using sustainably sourced medicinal and aromatic plants for product development?

February 26 and 27
Sheraton Rittenhouse Square
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

MEDICINAL PLANTS IN DANGER
The first international survey of plant diversity found that at least one out of every eight known plant species on Earth is now threatened with extinction. According to the report, it is estimated that about 29% of 16,000 species are at risk in the United States alone. Similar percentages were recorded for Australia and South Africa.
(Twenty-Year Project Warns of Major Diversity Loss, Curt Suplee, Washington Post Staff Writer. April 8, 1998: Page A01.)

TAKE LEADERSHIP IN PRESERVING MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS
Manufacturers using herbal and aromatic plants -- in whole plant form, as extracts, isolated components or molecules -- as templates for creating active ingredients for the pharmaceutical industry are profiting from tens of billions of dollars worldwide. Much of the plant material for these industries is derived-or has been derived in the early stages of development -from wild sources.

As industry leaders, it is important for us to become stewards of the environment by taking active roles in planning for the sustainability of these precious natural resources, and not contributing to the destruction of biodiversity.

Join us at Symposium 2001 to learn of impending problems and real solutions that will help you - and your company - take leadership roles in the sustainable use of plant materials.

The symposium will bring together users of plant ingredients, plant collectors, conservationists, environmentalists and Native Peoples. Our goal is for this to be the first of many such meetings devoted to the discussion of conservation.

VALUABLE FACTS FOR THE FRAGRANCE INDUSTRY
Our symposium -- while focusing on medicinal plants -- will be exploring many areas concerning aromatic plant materials collected from the wild, making it important for industries employing natural aromatic plants. The lessons learned by the medicinal plant industry using materials sourced from wild - crafting and cultivation will also be invaluable to the aroma industry for designing systems of long-term sustainability.

The symposium has been organized by members of the Medicinal Plant Working Group (MPWG), American Botanical Council (ABC), American Herbal Products Association (AHPA), Association for Biodiversity Information (ABI), Aveda Corporation, Frontier Herbs, Glaxo Smith Kline (GSK), Missouri Botanical Gardens, Native American Elder Circle, Pfizer, The Nature Conservancy, US Fish and Wildlife Service and other earth-friendly organizations.

WHAT IS THE MEDICINAL PLANT WORKING GROUP (MPWG)?
The MPWG is part of the Plant Conservation Alliance (PCA) -- a consortium of ten federal agencies and more than 145 non-federal cooperators working collectively to prevent plant extinction and to encourage natural habitat restoration. For more information visit: http://www.nps.gov/plants/medicinal/index.htm

WHAT DOES THE MEDICINAL PLANT WORKING GROUP DO?
The primary focus of the MPWG is to facilitate action on behalf of medicinal plants native to the United States that are of particular conservation concern. Its aim is to minimize regulatory intervention in the long term by balancing biological and commercial needs now. The group promotes information sharing among federal, state and private organizations.

HEAR FROM EXPERTS IN THE FIELDS OF CONSERVATION, CULTIVATION, PHARMACOGNOSY, INDUSTRY AND INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE, INCLUDING:

  • Gary Paul Nabhan, Ph.D.
    Director, Center for Sustainable Environments, Northern Arizona University
  • Bruce Stein
    Vice President for Programs, Association for Biodiversity Information (ABI)
  • Leon Secatero
    Spiritual Elder, Canoncito Navajo
  • Michael McGuffin
    President, American Herbal Products Association (AHPA)
  • Pierre Franchomme
    Aromatic Sourcing Expert, Estée Lauder Corporation
  • Mark Blumenthal
    Founder and Executive Director, American Botanical Council (ABC)

AT THE SYMPOSIUM, FIND OUT HOW TO:

  • Ask the right questions
  • Plan projects based on sustainability issues from inception to completion
  • Find biodiversity information on plants
  • Locate and plan for sustainable resources globally
  • Learn from others' success stories and failures in cultivation and wild collection
  • Share your own experiences
  • Maximize long term sales and profits through sustainability
  • Become more aware, as members of the Native American Elder Circle share their informed approach to conservation
  • Participate in a forum to discuss industry action to preserve medicinal and aromatic plant biodiversity globally
  • Contribute to conservation

THE NATIVE AMERICAN ELDER CIRCLE
The Native American Elder Circle has helped to plan and guide this symposium. Thank You to:

Susan Burdick, Yurok/Karuk, California
Ray Couch, Cherokee of the Appalachians
Tis Mal Cro Crow, United Lumbee/Hitchiti, Tennessee
Jane Dumas, Kumeyaay, California
John George, Catawba, South Carolina
Rudy Hall, Accohanock
Cecelia Mitchell, Mohawk, New York/Canada
Leon Secatero, Canoncito Navajo, New Mexico

Plant 1Plant 2Plant 3Plant 4Plant 5Plant 6
Photos provided by Steven Foster Group, Inc. www.stevenfoster.com

Last Updated: 3 February 2005