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Green Medicine > Summary of Colorado Inventory & Monitoring Projects

Research Summaries: Osha - Colorado

2002 Summary of Colorado Osha Inventory and Harvest:
On September 9-10, 2002, Rio Grande National Forest hosted the first osha (Ligusticum porteri) Plant Conservation Alliance-Medicinal Plant Working Group (PCA-MPWG) inventory and harvest, led by Trish Flaster (Botanical Liaisons, LLC Executive Director and Chair of the MPWG Conservation and Ethnobotany Committees) and FS employee, Vince Spero. Field work was provided by 24 volunteers. Project achievements include the collection baseline data for osha at this site and the first test of a revised protocol that had initially been devised for use with black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) in the Appalachian mountains (Annex III). The project also drew on a diverse collection of community volunteers, thus expanding community recognition of the value of native wild plants. Among the 24 volunteers were Colorado Garden Club of America (GCA) members and their husbands, California GCA members, a local restaurateur, an ethnobotanist/herbalist from Montana, an Herbalist and his students from New Mexico, a rare plant specialist and other staff from the Denver Botanic Garden, a state germination specialist, an osha researcher, and researchers working with a network of harvesters across the United States. A total of 21 plots were, established. Plants were identified, measured, and permanently tagged and numbered. Plots were randomly assigned to light and heavy harvest regimes. Root material from harvested plants was sent to the University of Mississippi to be analyzed for active ingredients. Results will provide a baseline for comparison against 2003 collected material. Materials not sent to Mississippi were replanted in a designated sites were recorded and will be monitored during future studies.

2003 Summary of Colorado Osha Inventory and Harvest:
On September 6-9, 2003, Rio Grande National Forest hosted the second osha (Ligusticum porteri) PCA-MPWG inventory and harvest project. Led by Trish Flaster (Botanical Liaisons, LLC Executive Director and Co-chair of the MPWG Conservation and Ethnobotany Committees) and FS employee, Vince Spero, field work was again accomplished with the assistance of volunteers. Project achievements included the collection baseline data for osha at a new site and the continued refinement of the a collection protocol. As before, the project drew on a diverse collection of community volunteers. Among the volunteers were Colorado GCA members and their husbands, California GCA members, 3 Forest Service employees, a Naturopathic doctor, an Native elder and healer, staff from the Denver Botanic Garden, an osha researcher, and researchers working with a network of harvesters across the United States. A total of 14 -5X20 M plots were installed. 769 Plants were identified, their X,Y coordinates were taken, plants measured, and the mature plants that were harvested were permanently tagged and numbered. 52 Mature randomly selected plants were harvested at 0, 33% or 66%. Root material was sent to the University of Mississippi to be analyzed for active ingredients. Results from the 2003 field season provide the basis for trend data for the osha project.

2004 Summary of Colorado Osha Inventory and Harvest:
On August 21-22, 2004 Rio Grande National Forest hosted the third osha (Ligusticum porteri) PCA-MPWG inventory and harvest project. Led by Trish Flaster (Botanical Liaisons, LLC Executive Director and Chair of the MPWG Conservation and Ethnobotany Committees), Denver Botanic Gardens’ staff, and USFS employee (Vince Spero) field work was again accomplished with the assistance of volunteers. Project achievements included the collection of baseline data for osha at the site, volunteer involvement, and preliminary analysis of population trends and the effects of harvesting at different levels. As before, the project drew on a diverse collection of community volunteers. Among the volunteers were Colorado GCA members and their husbands, 2 Forest Service employees, an Native elder and healer, staff from the Denver Botanic Garden, an osha researcher, and researchers working with a network of harvesters across the United States. A total of 18 (5X20 M) plots were resampled. 1503 Plants were identified, their X/Y coordinates were taken, plants measured, and the mature plants that were harvested were permanently tagged and numbered. 144 Mature randomly selected plants were harvested from the plots at 0%, 33% or 66%. Root material was sent to the University of Mississippi to be analyzed for active ingredients. Results from the three field seasons provide the basis for population trend data and analysis of the effects of harvesting on population density. A fourth year of data collection is necessary to complete the resampling of all 26 plots installed at the site and provide sufficient data for statistical analysis.

2005 Summary of Colorado Osha Inventory and Harvest:
On August 19-21, 2005, Rio Grande National Forest hosted the fourth osha (Ligusticum porteri) PCA-MPWG inventory and harvest project. Led by Trish Flaster (Botanical Liaisons, LLC Executive Director and Chair of the MPWG Conservation and Ethnobotany Committees), Tom Grant (Denver Botanic Garden), and Vince Spero (USFS employee), field work was again accomplished with the assistance of 16 volunteers, primarily from the Garden Club of America. All 26 plots were sampled this year. Mature randomly selected plants were harvested from the plots at 0%, 33% or 66%. Root material was sent to the University of Mississippi to be analyzed for active ingredients. This information, together with the previous three years should provide sufficient data for statistical analysis, which will allow us to analyze population trends and the effect of harvesting on population density. An added emphasis was placed on training this year. The volunteer training manual, developed by GCA’s Katherine Schlosser, was adapted to this field site. Training took place the afternoon before the field work and was well-received by volunteers. Feedback from volunteers was positive, with constructive suggestions for next year.

See the 2005 Colorado project proposal for other information.

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Last Updated: 31-Jul-2006