• Pipe Spring National Monument

    Pipe Spring

    National Monument Arizona

Amphibians

Spadefoot Tadpoles at Pipe Spring National Monument

Tadpoles found a Pipe Spring National Monument

Most amphibians lay their eggs in water. For that reason most amphibians are born in water, and stay in water during their early years of life. Amphibians suffer through a form change, when they get older. This new form allows the amphibians to breathe outside of water. Though, not all amphibians can breathe outside of water, even when they are older. Some amphibians will grow gills later in the life. Amphibians are able to exchange gasses with the water or air. Amphibians will use their skin to exchange gasses, and in order to do so, the skin of an amphibian must be moist. Therefore, amphibians cannot survive without water for a long time.

Amphibian species at Pipe Spring:

Tiger Salamander Ambystoma tigrinum
Woodhouse's Toad Bufo woodhousii
Great Basin Spadefoot Spea intermontana


 

Did You Know?

Petroglyphs near Pipe Spring National Monument.

Petroglyphs are pictures or symbols pecked into rock and pictographs are pictures or symbols painted on rock.