• Indianhead Point stands tall along the Pictured Rocks. Photo copyright Craig Blacklock

    Pictured Rocks

    National Lakeshore Michigan

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Alger Women of Honor 2009

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Date: August 21, 2009
Contact: Mary Jo Cook, 906-387-2607, ext. 213

(Munising, MICH.) The public is invited to attend the fourteenth annual Woman of Honor Observance to be held on Thursday, August 27. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is sponsoring the event.

The program will be held at the Alger County Heritage Center located at 1496 Washington Street in Munising. Barb Trombley, Leader of Superior Corners 4-H Club of Chatham, will be the featured guest speaker. A social gathering will begin at 6 p.m. with the program beginning at 6:30 p.m.

The roll of honor recognizes Alger County women who have lead enriched lives whether through work, hobby, volunteerism or everyday living. At this year's event three women will be honored.

The honorees are Claudia VanLandschoot and Paula Ackerman of Munising, and Martha Verbrigghe of Chatham.

The Woman of Honor Observance celebrates the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. The theme of this year's observance is, "Women taking the lead to save our planet".

Acting Superintendent Chris Case stated, "It's so nice that the park can work with the community to recognize the area's accomplished women."


For more information or to submit a nomination for 2010, please contact Mary Jo Cook at 906-387-2607, ext. 213, or visit www.nps.gov/piro/planyourvisit/algerwomenroll.htm

Did You Know?

Bear claw scars on the smooth bark of an American beech tree.

Bear claw marks can be seen on the trunks of American beech trees because the bark is so smooth. Bears climb trees for safety and to eat beech nuts. The non-native beech bark disease is sweeping through Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, killing many beech trees. Trees scarred with bear claw marks will be harder to find. More...