• The tower of the Au Sable Light Station against a summer blue sky. Photo © Craig Blacklock

    Pictured Rocks

    National Lakeshore Michigan

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Winter road closures

    While the calendar may say it is spring, Mother Nature says it is still winter in the central Upper Peninsula. Most roads remain closed by snow. More »

Snow Removal and Grounds Maintenance

 
The picnic area at Miners Castle invites visitors to sit a spell and enjoy the view.

Picnic area at Miners Castle

NPS photo

Natural Vegetation Enhancement and Mowing Reduction Program

Over the past several years, the lakeshore has undertaken a reduced mowing program to:

1. Reduce the number of man-made fixtures adjacent to natural areas.

2. Return appropriate areas to their more natural appearance.

3. Reduce manpower requirements to mow and trim outlying areas and maintain bollards and delineator posts.

4. Reduce emissions from mowers.


An example of this initiative is at
Miners Castle, the lakeshore’s premiere day use area. Three of five developed acres have been allowed to grow back naturally. This action cuts mowing costs and allows wildflowers to multiply.

 
Lakeshore truck plows snow along Sand Point Road.

Snow plowing at the Lakeshore

NPS photo

Eliminating Use of Road Salt in Snow Removal Operations

In addition to parking lots and accesses, the lakeshore plows three miles of low speed roadway within 50 feet of the Lake Superior shoreline. In the past, salt was mixed with sand to clear snow from the roadway to bare pavement, as well as preventing the loaded sand from freezing in the truck while being stored outside.

In 1995, the park began keeping the spreader truck in a heated building, and determined that it was not necessary to maintain the roads at a "bare pavement" standard. These two actions eliminated the need for road salt use in the lakeshore. The lakeshore now spreads sand on roadways when conditions necessitate.

Several immediate benefits were realized:

1. Eliminated salt runoff into the adjacent streams and lake.

2. Reduced corrosion of equipment from the salt.

3. Reduced wear and tear on the equipment from frozen mechanical components.

4. Eliminated the need to purchase road salt.

 

For more information ...
please visit our Green Resources page.

Return to top of page

Did You Know?

The purple flower of spotted knapweed, a non-native invasive species, is shown with Pitcher's thistle, an endangered species.

Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is home to two arctic disjuncts, plants whose normal range is far to the north. Arctic crowberry and thimbleberry thrive because of the cool and moist microclimates caused by Lake Superior. More...