• Artist George Catlin recorded the quarrying activity at the pipestone quarries in 1836

    Pipestone

    National Monument Minnesota

Pets

Many visitors enjoy the company of their pets as they experience the beautiful native prairie and sacred historical park. In order to preserve this cherished resource and keep the park clean and safe for all visitors, please observe the following guidelines when bringing your pet(s) into the park.

Pets are not permitted in the visitor center. (Exception: Service animals are permitted while functioning in their work capacity.)

Adequate water, shade, and supervision are all important considerations for your pet, especially in the hot summer months. Pets may not be left unattended or tied up outside while at the park.

All pets must be on a leash

Pets must be kept on a six-foot leash and under physical control at all times while visiting any area of the park. This prevents encounters between pets and wildlife, protects pets from hazards, and prevents unwanted interaction between pets and other visitors.

Disposal of pet waste

Pet waste may not be left on the ground in the park. Please bring plastic/litter bags and/or a scoop. Once you've picked up your pet's waste with a litter bag, you may dispose of it in any outdoor trash can or remove it from the park.

Cleaning up after your dog is your responsibility. Pet waste can transmit disease to children, other pets and wildlife.

Pet behavior at the park

Pets should be accustomed to proper behavior around people, other pets, and wildlife. Digging, clawing, and other destruction of natural and historical resources are strictly prohibited. Unreasonable amounts of noise and harassment of wildlife are not permitted in the park.

Report loose pets

If your pet escapes its leash and/or becomes lost in the park, please notify park staff immediately. Never abandon a pet, wanted or unwanted, in the park.

Did You Know?

A quarry site with quartzite rubble pile

Archeological evidence indicates that the quarrying of pipestone has occurred for 3,000 years at Pipestone National Monument. The important traditions of pipestone quarrying and pipemaking continue today. More...