• High Peaks and Big Berry Manzanita. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

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  • No Fires - Fire Danger EXTREME - No Fuego

    No Fires in the campground, no smoking on the trails. Observe these rules to protect park resources. No se permite fumar en los senderos, tampoco se permite las fogatas en el campamento. Proteja los recursos del parque y respete las advertencias. More »

  • Fee Increase at Pinnacles National Park

    On August 1, 2014 the 7 day entrance pass for Pinnacles National Park will increase to $10 for passenger vehicles and motorcycles; bicycle and pedestrian entry will increase to $5.00. The Pinnacles Annual Pass will increase on August 1 to $20.00. More »

Status of the Caves

Bear Gulch Cave

PARTIALLY OPEN

The lower portion of Bear Gulch Cave is open. The upper portion of the caves remains closed since a protected colony of Townsend's big-eared bats is occupying the upper caves and are extremely sensitive to human disturbance.

Balconies Cave

OPEN

These caves can be closed suddenly due to storms and high water. Please check before your visit to get the most current cave status. Flashlights are required for both caves.
 
Looking up through one of many openings in the Bear Gulch Cave

Information About the Seasonal Opening of the Bear Gulch Cave

The Bear Gulch Cave provides a home to a colony of Townsend's big-eared bats as they rest there in winter and raise their young in the late spring and summer. Townsend's big-eared bats are listed as a "sensitive species" by the state of California, and we are required to protect them. The colony in the Bear Gulch Cave is the largest maternity colony between San Francisco and Mexico.

The lower half of the Bear Gulch Cave is usually open from mid-July through mid-May each year, depending on the presence of the colony of bats. The entire cave is closed from mid-May to mid-July while the bats are raising their young.

We have constructed a gate that will allow us to open approximately half of the cave to the public while still protecting the colony of Townsend's big-eared bats. A new trail leaves the middle of the cave and connects with the Moses Spring Trail, which leads to the reservoir.

 

As long as the hibernating colony of bats shows no signs of disturbance, we plan to keep over half of the Bear Gulch Cave open for almost ten months each year, from mid-July through mid-May. During especially warm springs, however, it's possible that the entire cave will be closed before mid-May if the maternity colony is present.

The entire cave will continue to be closed through late spring and early summer for pupping season, from mid-May through Mid-July. The entire Bear Gulch Cave will also be open twice a year for at least one week and up to four weeks each March and October, depending on the presence of the colony of bats.

Schedule of the Seasonal Opening of the Bear Gulch Cave
These dates may change if the colony of bats changes its breeding patterns or shows signs of disturbance.

March The lower half of the cave may be open for the full month. The entire cave is open for at least a week, usually the last week of the month. The entire cave may also open earlier, depending on the presence of the colony of bats.
April 1 - mid-May The lower half of the cave may be open.
Mid-May - mid-July The entire cave will be closed to protect the colony of bats as they raise their young.
Mid-July - September 30 The lower half of the cave may be open.
October The entire cave is open for at least a week, usually the last week of the month. The entire cave may also open earlier, depending on the presence of the colony of bats.
Nov. 1 - end of Feb. The lower half of the cave may be open.


 

Video of Townsend's big-eared bats in the Bear Gulch Cave
This video was taken by biologists using an infrared camera. This type of camera will not disturb the bats as they roost because like humans, they cannot see light in the infrared spectrum. This means that the camera can capture the images in total darkness.

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

California condors have a wingspan approaching nine and a half feet. Condors soar and glide at up to 55 miles per hour, and can sometimes be mistaken for a small airplane. More...