• High Peaks and Big Berry Manzanita. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • No Fires - Fire Danger EXTREME - No Fuego

    No Fires in the campground, no smoking on the trails. Observe these rules to protect park resources. No se permite fumar en los senderos, tampoco se permite las fogatas en el campamento. Proteja los recursos del parque y respete las advertencias. More »

  • Fee Increase at Pinnacles National Park

    On August 1, 2014 the 7 day entrance pass for Pinnacles National Park will increase to $10 for passenger vehicles and motorcycles; bicycle and pedestrian entry will increase to $5.00. The Pinnacles Annual Pass will increase on August 1 to $20.00. More »

California Condor

Turkey Vulture and California Condor flying

Turkey Vulture (top) and California Condor (bottom) in flight

©Richard Lewis

California Condor. Gymnogyps californianus

Possessing a nearly ten-foot wingspan, the California Condor is one of the rarest birds in North America and was heading towards extinction in the 1980s before an intensive conservation program began to manage the remaining birds. Larger than Bald and Golden Eagles and masters of flight, condors make their homes in the rock towers, cliffs, and spires of Pinnacles National Park. Despite their larger size, condors and Turkey Vultures can be mistaken for each other, especially when sighted from a distance. When seen from below in flight, adult condors have white triangular patches on the leading edge of the wings. Condors are scavengers and cover a huge range in their search for carrion; they can glide from Pinnacles National Park to the Big Sur coast in about an hour. If you do see a California Condor, count yourself fortunate in witnessing a charismatic species whose near-extinction and slow but steady recovery can be traced to human impacts and intervention.


Diet: A scavenger, condors will feed on a range of carcasses, from rodents up to deer, cows, and marine mammals.


Wingspan: 109” (9.5 - 10 feet!), largest wingspan of North American birds Length: 46”


Did you know? During times of courtship or alarm, the bare head of an adult condor can turn a deep pinkish red.


Did You Know?

Pinnacles bee photo by Keir Morse

Pinnacles National Park has the greatest number of bee species per unit area of any place ever studied. The roughly 400 bee species are mostly solitary; they don't live in hives.