• High Peaks and Big Berry Manzanita. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • No Fires - Fire Danger EXTREME - No Fuego

    No Fires in the campground, no smoking on the trails. Observe these rules to protect park resources. No se permite fumar en los senderos, tampoco se permite las fogatas en el campamento. Proteja los recursos del parque y respete las advertencias. More »

  • Fee Increase at Pinnacles National Park

    On August 1, 2014 the 7 day entrance pass for Pinnacles National Park will increase to $10 for passenger vehicles and motorcycles; bicycle and pedestrian entry will increase to $5.00. The Pinnacles Annual Pass will increase on August 1 to $20.00. More »

Fire Management

Fire is a natural process that has shaped the plant communities at Pinnacles National Monument. The goal of the new fire management plan is to mimic natural conditions, allowing native plant species to thrive.

Park managers will consider using prescribed fire in areas that have not burned for a long time or where ecosystems have been altered by negative human impacts. Prescribed fire will only be used when weather conditions are safe for burning.

The Pinnacles National Monument Fire Management Plan and Environmental Assessment are available online. If you have a dial-up connection, the plan has been divided into smaller sections for easier downloading.

Pinnacles National Monument Fire Management Plan (complete)

Title Page

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 - Foundation of the FMP

Chapter 2 - Fire Management Strategies

Chapter 3 - Fire Mgmt Program Components

Chapter 4 - Roles, Funding, and Review

Appendices A - G

Appendix H, part 1

Appendix H, part 2

Environmental Assessment

Fire Management Plan Mailer

Did You Know?

The Five Sisters rock formation, as seen from the Bear Gulch Reservoir

Pinnacles National Park began as a volcanic field that originated about 195 miles south of its present location. It has traveled northward along the San Andreas Fault, and currently moves at a rate of about 3 - 6 centimeters per year.