• High Peaks and Big Berry Manzanita. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • No Fires - Fire Danger EXTREME - No Fuego

    No Fires in the campground, no smoking on the trails. Observe these rules to protect park resources. No se permite fumar en los senderos, tampoco se permite las fogatas en el campamento. Proteja los recursos del parque y respete las advertencias. More »

  • Fee Increase at Pinnacles National Park

    On August 1, 2014 the 7 day entrance pass for Pinnacles National Park will increase to $10 for passenger vehicles and motorcycles; bicycle and pedestrian entry will increase to $5.00. The Pinnacles Annual Pass will increase on August 1 to $20.00. More »

Mammals

Forty-nine mammalian species, aside from humans, are known to occur within Pinnacles National Park. Those often seen and enjoyed by visitors and staff include: black-tailed deer, bobcat, gray fox, raccoon, jackrabbit, brush rabbit, ground squirrel, chipmunk, and several kinds of bat. These animals are reported regularly because they are either easy to see or charismatic. Badgers, coyotes, a wide variety of rodents, and mountain lions inhabit the Park, but are not commonly seen. The infrequent sighting of some of the mammals in the Park points to a difficulty in studying them: extensive monitoring is required to determine baseline data on all mammalian species within Pinnacles. This work will be ongoing for many years, and we will keep you informed about it. For example, we are currently conducting a small mammal survey, which may soon be available on our web pages.

The mammals at Pinnacles belong to the following orders: Marsupialia (1), Insectivora (3), Chiroptera (16), Lagomorpha (3), Rodentia (15),Carnivora (9) and Artiodactyla (2). Included in these are three mammals which have been introduced to Pinnacles -- the house mouse, opossum, and feral pig. The house mouse (Mus musculus) and opossum (Didelphis virginiana) are rare and not considered threatening to Pinnacles’ native ecosystems. Feral pigs (Sus scrofa), on the other hand, are abundant within the Park and cause extensive damage to the native vegetation. Based on several years of research, a decision was made to construct a fence around the Park’s perimeter. Pigs within the fence will be removed, and new pig incursions will be prevented.

Related Information:
Mammal Checklist for Pinnacles National Monument

Did You Know?

A close-up view of rhyolite breccia

Rhyolitic breccia is the rock that the High Peaks and other rock formations at Pinnacles are made of. Rhyolite breccia is composed of lava sand, ash, and angular chunks of rock that were explosively ejected from the Pinnacles Volcano.