• Big-berry manzanita and the skyline of the high peaks greet visitors who explore the steep and narrow portion of the High Peaks trail. NPS Photo|Sierra Willoughby

    Pinnacles

    National Park California

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  • CAUTION: Trail Work and Horses Present on Juniper Canyon and Tunnel Trails

    Do not run or make loud noises near working horses. Only approach horses if directed to do so by trail work staff. If Horses are Approaching, find a safe place to step uphill and off the trail. Do not approach horses from behind (April 21 - 25)

Pinnacles National Monument Condor Program Milestones

588
Condor 588 shortly after being released in 2011
NPS Photo by Paul Johnson
 

2003

Joint effort with National Park Service and Ventana Wildlife Society construction of captive flight pen commences

First release of two birds on December 20, 2003

A few birds are outfitted with GPS transceivers

2004

On August 15th, condor 199, originally released by Ventana Wildlife Society in Big Sur flies to Pinnacles and spent the next few days feeding alongside the Pinnacles' birds.

2006

Motion sensor cameras are setup at bait stations

Walk-in freezer allows program to keep more donated dairy calves for baiting condors

Remote video setup at bait station

First time Pinnacles'-released condors make a flight over to the Big Sur Coast release site managed by Ventana Wildlife Society(VWS)

2007

Point Reyes donates exotic deer from eradication program to use as bait for the condors

First non-lead shooting event held to educate public about the wildlife and human health issues with using lead ammunition

Obtained a base increase in funding for the park to hire employees for the recovery program

2008

Wireless surveillance cameras setup at flight pen and bait station

Condors from Pinnacles National Park fly in a very publicized visit to Mt. Hamilton, expanding their range even further North

Non-Lead Outreach position gains funding at the park

2009

First Pinnacles'-released condor (313) successfully nests in the wild and fledged condor 514

2010

First documented condor nest within the Pinnacles National Park boundary since 1898 (Condors 318/317)

VWS released condor 219 breeds with Pinnacles' released female 310 and successfully fledge their own young (574) from a wild nest

Researchers identify and locate an additional source of lead in the environment caused by lead paint on an old firetower within park boundaries

Pinnacles National Park feral pig eradication begins donating exotic pig carcasses shot with copper ammunition to the condors as bait

2011

In December remediation of the firetower's lead paint is completed

The Condor Care Unit consisting of an on-site radiograph, holding and exam rooms is completed

2012

Re-construction of captive flight pen-scheduled completed in October

2013

Remote telemetry stations in use to assist in tracking condors to be completed by year end

Did You Know?

Starry skies. Photo courtesy of NASA.

The night sky is vital to many plants and animals that call Pinnacles home and it holds many meanings for many cultures. An unpolluted night sky is especially valuable to humans wishing to experience natural darkness, shooting stars, or the Milky Way.