Lesson Plan

Picture the War

Students at Stop #3

Leslie McClammy

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Grade Level:
Fifth Grade-Twelfth Grade
Subject:
Civil War, History, Theatre
Duration:
2 Hours
Group Size:
Up to 36
Setting:
in the park
National/State Standards:
SOL’s VUS.1, VUS.7, AII.15, AII.13, USI9, Visial Arts 702, 8.7, 8.8, 8.12, 8.20, 8.21, 8.22

Overview

This program introduces students to the analysis of primary sources through critical observation of historical photographs. Students will take photographs of each other and will learn a few basic rules of good photography. Students will role play the parts of Civil War soldiers manning the trenches during the Siege of Petersburg.

Objective(s)

This program introduces students to the analysis of primary sources through critical observation of historical photographs.

Background

Explain that cameras that were easily moved from place to place were relatively new during the Civil War. Explain that even though cameras could be moved they still required great care and lots of equipment. Mention Mathew Brady's movable darkrooms. Briefly explain how the glass plate negatives were first treated with colliodon, then washed in silver nitrate, then had to be used by being exposed to light within 10min to take a picture. Does this sound like a quick and easy way to take a picture? Well it was during the Civil War.

Procedure

Assessment

The pictures will be placed on a disk, given to the teacher for the students to critique and to enjoy. A movie will be made of the pictures by the battlefield and sent to the school for review.

Provide the teachers and students report cards to evaluate their likes and dislikes of the activities. Suggestions?


 

Park Connections

Nine and a half months, 70,000 casualties, the suffering of civilians, thousands of U. S. Colored Troops fighting for the freedom of their race, and the decline of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of No. Virginia all describe the Siege of Petersburg. It was here Gen. Ulysses S. Grant cut off all of Petersburg's supply lines ensuring the fall of Richmond on April 3, 1865. Six days later, Lee surrendered

Additional Resources

For a complete listing of Park Programs see the Peterbsurg Battlefield Educators Guide