• Aerial View of Padre Island National Seashore

    Padre Island

    National Seashore Texas

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  • Park Phone issues

    The visitor center main phone line and fax line are not working. To reach the park visitor center, call (361) 949-8069. Fax to (361) 949-7091, Attention: Visitor Center. We apologize for the inconvenience.

  • Bird Island Basin Campground rehabilitation starts August 18, 2014

    The second part of a project to repair facilities and rebuild eroded shoreline at Bird Island Basin Campground begins August 18. Minor disruptions of activities in the immediate area may occur. None of the work should affect use of the boat ramp.

For Teachers

Students examine sea creatures caught during our Hidden Treasures program.

Students examine sea creatures caught during our Hidden Treasures program.

NPS photo

Padre Island National Seashore offers great tools to complement your curriculum and broaden the experiences of your students. Programs are available for all age groups and are designed to meet Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) requirements. Topics range from sea turtle biology to barrier island geology to marine pollution and more. You can bring students to the park for an adventure on the beach and one or more on-site programs; get students involved in a beach cleanup; or bring the beach to the classroom with an off-site program.

Educational groups can request fee waivers that provide free entrance into the park. Through a partnership with Shark-a-thon, we also offer a limited number of transportation grants each year to help eligible schools cover the cost of transportation to the park. And all programs for school and other educational groups are offered free of charge.

Download our environmental education guide, or contact our Education Specialist at (361)949-8069, for more information.

Did You Know?

White-tailed buck (odocoileus virginianus)

The white-tailed deer on the island are not considered the island's largest native mammal because they are believed to come across the Laguna Madre from the mainland. Coyotes are considered the island's largest native mammal. More...