• Speleothems in Miller's Chapel.

    Oregon Caves

    National Monument Oregon

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  • Haunted Candlelight Tours

    Haunted Candlelight Tours Offered Sunday, October 26 through Friday, October 31, 2014. The tour begins at 4pm and are first come first serve. The tour is limited to 12 people per group. Last regular cave tour will be at 3pm.

Things To Know Before You Come

Oregon Caves Cave Tour
Visitors must accompany a ranger on a guided tour in order to see the cave. The 90-minute cave tour is considered moderately strenuous and is not recommended for people with heart, breathing, or walking problems. Tour times vary according to the season in order to accommodate the availability of staff and number of people waiting on a tour. View the most up-to-date schedule.

Be Prepared for Your Cave Tour
The temperature inside the cave is 44F (7C) year round. Be sure to wear warm clothing and comfortable closed-toe walking shoes. Find out more about What to Bring for the Tour and What NOT to Bring for the Tour.

Height Requirement
Children must be at least 42 inches tall and be able to demonstrate their ability to climb a set of test stairs in order to participate in a cave tour.

Avoid Long Waits
Wait times for cave tours can reach up to two hours during the summer season. The busiest times are between 11:00 am & 3:00 pm. Earlier or later arrival is recommended. On busy days, there are a variety of activities to enjoy while you wait for your tour including Ranger conducted walks and talks, tours of the Oregon Caves Chateau, a historic lodge, short loop trails through the forest, and a Junior Ranger program for children.

Accessibility
Only the first room of the cave is accessible to wheelchairs. Service animals are not allowed in the cave. Please refer to the Accessibility page for more information.

Food and Lodging
Food and lodging are available in the historic Oregon Caves Chateau, a National Historic Landmark.

Did You Know?

Acid dew dissolves the cave wall to make small pock marks.

Carbon dioxide mixes with water that condenses on the wall of the cave to create a very weak acid. Over long periods of time this "acid dew" eats away at the marble walls of Oregon Caves making the cave larger.