• Speleothems in Miller's Chapel.

    Oregon Caves

    National Monument Oregon

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  • Road Work, Expect Delays

    ODOT will be preparing highway 46 for asphalt patching. Please use caution when traveling between the monument and Grayback Campground. Various work will be from continue until July 31, 2014.

  • Watch for Wildlife

    Please be on the lookout for fawns on the section of Caves Highway around Caves Campground! There is at least one very young one that is using the pavement as his transportation corridor.

Owls

Owls swoop silently through the night sky to feed on rodents, birds, reptiles, fish, and large insects. We have four types of owls at Oregon Caves National Monument - Saw-Whet Owls, Spotted Owls, Great Horned Owls, and Screech Owls.

The Saw-Whet Owl is a tiny, tuftless owl rarely seen unless found roosting in dense young evergreens or thickets. Its call is usually a series of short whistles.

The Spotted Owls have large dark eyes and puffy round heads. They are endangered because they live in mature, old-growth forests - many of which have been cut down. Their call is a series of sharp, high pitched hoots usually in groups of three.

Great Horned Owls are twice the size of a crow and can lift small mammals as large as a skunk. They live in forest, woodlots, near streams, and open country. The male makes a series of hoots - Hoo! Hu-hu-hu, Hoo! Hoo! The female hoots are higher and shorter in sequence.

Screech Owls are the common, small "eared" owls of towns, orchards, and woodlots. They are also found in wooded canyons. Their song is a quavering whistle. Screech owls are often the prey of spotted owls.

Did You Know?

Forest Service guide. Photo taken around 1915

Oregon Caves was managed by the Forest Service from 1909 to 1934 then it was transferred to management by the National Park Service.