• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Spruce Railroad Trail Closed from Lyre River Trailhead to Devil’s Punchbowl

    The trail will be closed for improvements from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Ranger-Guided Elwha Exploration Walks to Begin on Former Lake Aldwell

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 12, 2012

Beginning this Saturday, July 15, at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Olympic National Park rangers will lead guided interpretive walks along the Elwha River where Lake Aldwell once existed. These programs will be offered Saturdays and Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. through September 2.

Rangers will guide visitors through the dynamic landscape being created by the river following the removal of the Elwha Dam. Walks will provide a fascinating, up-close look at shifting sediments, both old and new vegetation, giant stumps logged a century ago, and the river re-establishing itself.

The walks are free and begin at the former boat launch located at the end of Lake Aldwell Road, which turns north off Highway 101 just west of the Elwha River bridge. Visitors should wear sturdy walking shoes or boots and be prepared for windy conditions with no shade. The guided portion of the walk will last approximately one hour.

For more information about Elwha Exploration Walks, contact the Elwha Ranger Station at (360) 452-9191.

Did You Know?

DYK fisher release

Fishers (members of the weasel family, related to minks and otters) were reintroduced to Olympic National Park in 2008-10. They are native to the forests of Washington, including the Olympic Peninsula, but disappeared due to overtrapping in the late 1800s/early 1900s and habitat loss.