• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Ditch Maintenance Along Park Roads: Motorists May Encounter Delays

    Motorists may encounter delays along Sol Duc Road (9/30 - 10/1), Whiskey Bend Road (10/2), Deer Park Road (10/7-10/8), and Hurricane Ridge Road (10/9 - 10/10) due to routine cleaning of roadway drainage ditches.

  • Olympic Hot Springs Road Closed

    The Elwha Valley's Olympic Hot Springs Road is closed to public entry beyond the Altair Campground. Olympic Hot Springs is not accessible from the Elwha. The road is expected to re-open by Summer 2015.

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Elwha Fisheries

The Elwha River was once one of the most productive salmon streams in the Pacific Northwest, home to all five species of Pacific salmon, as well as other fish species. But salmon have been blocked from all but the lowest five miles of the river since the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams were built in the the early 1900s. More on anadromous fish in the Elwha.

Removal of the two dams will restore the Elwha River to its natural, free-flowing state and will once again allow fish to access more than 70 river miles of pristine spawning habitat now protected within Olympic National Park. Once the dams are removed and the river restored, the river will once again produce historic levels of salmon and steelhead, with numbers exceeding 390,000 returning adult fish annually. Find out more about restoration approaches for each individual species, or read the full Elwha River Fish Restoration Plan.

 
 
 

Did You Know?

snow covered forest and meadow

That endemic Olympic snow moles are scurrying beneath this blanket of snow? Olympic National Park's Hurricane Ridge is blanketed with over ten feet of snow for most of the winter, providing water for summer and protection for snow moles in winter.