• Olympic: Three Parks in One

    Olympic

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Spruce Railroad Trail Closed from Lyre River Trailhead to Devil’s Punchbowl

    The trail will be closed for improvements from the Lyre River TH to approximately 0.25 miles east of Devil’s Punchbowl. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The remainder of the trail will be accessible from the Camp David Jr. Road TH. More »

  • Safety Advisory: Mountain Goats

    NPS has received reports of aggressive mountain goats near trails at Hurricane Ridge, Royal Basin, Seven Lakes Basin, Lake of the Angeles, & Grand Pass. Visitors are required to maintain a distance of at least 50 yards from all wildlife. More »

Hiking & Backpacking

When you visit the Olympic Wilderness, whether to clamber along the roaring beaches of the wilderness coast, to immerse yourself in the freshness and healing of the old-growth forests, or to push yourself up onto the peaks and ridges of the high country, keep in mind that this remnant of wild America is fragile.

This year, nearly 40,000 people will camp in the Olympic Wilderness and several hundred thousand people will take day hikes. The Wilderness Trip Planner is a useful resource with in-depth descriptions of trails, camping, precautions, and tips.

If we treat Olympic with respect, we can preserve its wildness and grandeur for future generations.

In 1988, Congress designated 95% of Olympic National Park as Wilderness. To find out more about wilderness, wilderness designation and the Wilderness Act, click here.

You can help preserve the beauty of this wilderness by learning how to Leave-No-Trace and Stop the Spread of Invasive Plants.

Did You Know?

white flower

Does this flower look familiar? The bunchberry, a common groundcover of Olympic's lowland forest, is closely related to the dogwood trees found throughout North America.