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U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

V. PREPARATION OF NHL NOMINATIONS

A thorough knowledge of the property and the national context in which it is to be evaluated are the beginning points for completing a nomination. The following information should be provided in order to illustrate how a property possesses exceptional value or quality in illustrating or interpreting a national context and to make a compelling justification for NHL designation.

1) Cite and justify the qualifying NHL criteria,
2) State the related NHL theme (see Chapter III on NHL Theme Studies) and explain the property's relationship to it,
3) Explain how the property has significance at a national level (which must include a summary statement of national significance to introduce the significance section),
4) Outline the historical background of this individual property, and
5) Establish the relative merit of the significance and integrity of the property in comparison to other similar, potentially nominated properties.

[photo]
District: Martin Luther King, Jr. Historic District, Atlanta, Georgia
Possessing a significant concentration, linkage, or continuity of sites, buildings, structures and objects united historically or aesthetically by plan or physical development, this district honors one of the nation's leaders in the 20th century's struggle for civil rights. The district contains King's birthplace, the church he pastored and his grave.

Nomination preparers should use the NHL form which is a slightly modified National Register of Historic Places Registration Form (NPS Form 10-900) to nominate properties for designation. A computer template for this form is available on diskette from the National Historic Landmarks Survey and NPS regional and support offices that work with the NHL Program along with technical instructions for its completion. When submitting a nomination, the electronic version of the nomination should be submitted, whether on diskette or via electronic mail, along with a printed copy of the nomination.

Anyone wishing to prepare an NHL nomination should first consult either the NHL Survey or the NPS regional and support office staff for information about theme studies and other comparable properties that may be relevant in the evaluation of particular properties and for preliminary advice on whether a property appears likely to meet NHL criteria. Copies of relevant studies and National Register documentation should be consulted if the property is listed in the National Register. State Historic Preservation Officers, Federal Preservation Officers, and Tribal Preservation Officers should also be consulted for information in their inventories that may be helpful in documenting a property.

The following special instructions for the text should be followed:

NHL Form Section 1.
Name of Property

Historic Name
Select the historic name reflecting the property's national significance.

Bethune, Mary McLeod, Home
Princeton Battlefield
Virginia City Historic District

Other Names/Site Number

Enter any other names by which the property has been commonly known. These names may reflect the property's history, current ownership, or popular use and may or may not reflect the historic name. Site numbers are often assigned to archeological sites for identification. This number may be placed on this line.

NHL Nomination Form Page 1[image] nomination form

NHL Form Section 2.
Location

Enter the street address of the property or the most specific location when no street number exists.

Mark an "x" in the boxes for both "not for publication" and "vicinity" (and add the name of the nearest city or town in the provided blank) to indicate that a property needs certain protection. The NPS shall withhold from disclosure to the public information about the location, character, or ownership of a historic resource if the Secretary of the Interior and the NPS determine that disclosure may

1) cause a significant invasion of privacy,
2) risk harm to the historic resource, or
3) impede the use of a traditional religious site by practitioners.

The Federal Register will indicate "Address Restricted" and give the nearest city or town as the property=s location. The NHL database will also refer to the location this way. Further, the NPS will exclude location and other appropriate information from any copies of documentation requested by the public.

Any information about the location, boundaries, or character of a property that should be restricted should be compiled on a separate sheet. On the same sheet, explain the reasons for restricting the information.

When it has been determined that this information should be withheld from the public, the Secretary, in consultation with the official recommending the restriction of information, shall determine who may have access to the information for the purpose of carrying out the National Historic Preservation Act.

[photo]
Farmers' and Merchants' Union Bank, Columbia, Wisconsin An example of a single building as resource type, this bank was designed and construction supervised by the great architect Louis Sullivan during his later years.
[photo] Reber Radio Telescope, Greenbank, West Virginia Structures are those functional constructions made usually for purposes other than creating human shelter. This telescope, with its designer and builder Grote Reber standing in front of it, was the first parabolic antenna specifically to aid research in the newly emerging field of radio astronomy.

[photo]
Morrow Plots, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois A site is the location of a significant event where the location itself possesses historic, cultural, or archeological value. Here was established the first soil experiment plots by a college in the United States. It has provided data on the effects of crop rotation and fertilization.

 

 


 

 

NHL Form Section 3.
Classification

Ownership of Property
Mark an "x" in all boxes that apply to indicate ownership of the property.

Category of Property
Mark an "x" in only one box to indicate the type of property being documented. (See Figure 3.)

Name of Multiple Property Listing

[photo] Beginning Point of the Louisiana Purchase Land Survey, Lee, Phillips, and Monroe Counties, Arkansas Objects are those constructions primarily artistic in nature or are relatively small in scale and simply constructed. This granite monument, erected in 1926, marks the site of the initial point from which the lands acquired in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 were subsequently surveyed, beginning in 1815.


Enter the name of the multiple property listing if the property is being nominated as part of a multiple property submission.

Number of Resources Within Property
Enter the number of resources in each category that make up the property. Count contributing resources separately from noncontributing resources. Total each column. (See Figure 4.)

A contributing building, site, structure, or object adds to the historical associations, historic architectural qualities, or archeological values for which a property is nationally significant because it was present during the period of significance, relates to the documented significance of the property, and possesses a high degree of historical integrity.

A noncontributing building, site, structure, or object was not present during the period of national significance, does not relate to the documented national significance of the property, or due to alterations, disturbances, additions, or other changes, it no longer possesses a high degree of historical integrity. If resources of state or local significance are included and their significance is justified in the documentation, they should be counted separately from those that contribute to the national significance.

Number of Contributing Resources Previously Listed in the National Register

Enter the number of any contributing resources already listed in the National Register. This would include both previously designated NHLs and authorized historic units of the National Park System as well as other previously listed National Register properties. If no resources are already listed, enter "N/A."

Figure 3.

National Register Property and Resource Types

 

BUILDING - A building, such as a house, barn, church, hotel, or similar construction, is created principally to shelter any form of human activity. "Building" may also be used to refer to a historically and functionally related unit, such as a courthouse and jail or a house and barn.
Examples: houses, barns, stables, sheds, garages, courthouses, city halls, social halls, commercial buildings, libraries, factories, mills, train depots, stationary mobile homes, hotels, theaters, schools, stores, and churches.

SITE - A site is the location of a significant event, a prehistoric or historic occupation or activity, or a building or structure, whether standing, ruined, or vanished, where the location itself possesses historic, cultural, or archeological value regardless of the value of any existing structure.
Examples: habitation sites, funerary sites, rock shelters, village sites, hunting and fishing sites, ceremonial sites, petroglyphs, rock carvings, gardens, grounds, battlefields, ruins of historic buildings and structures, campsites, sites of treaty signings, trails, areas of land, shipwrecks, cemeteries, designed landscapes, and natural features, such as springs and rock formations, and land areas having cultural significance.

STRUCTURE - The term "structure" is used to distinguish from buildings those functional constructions made usually for purposes other than creating human shelter.

Examples: bridges, tunnels, gold dredges, firetowers, canals, turbines, dams, power plants, corncribs, silos, roadways, shot towers, windmills, grain elevators, kilns, mounds, cairns, palisade fortifications, earthworks, railroad grades, systems of roadways and paths, boats and ships, railroad locomotives and cars, telescopes, carousels, bandstands, gazebos, and aircraft.

OBJECT - The term "object" is used to distinguish from buildings and structures those constructions that are primarily artistic in nature or are relatively small in scale and simply constructed. Although it may be, by nature or design, movable, an object is associated with a specific setting or environment.
Examples: sculpture, monuments, boundary markers, statuary, and fountains.

DISTRICT - A district possesses a significant concentration, linkage, or continuity of sites, buildings, structures, or objects united historically or aesthetically by plan or physical development.
Examples: college campuses; central business districts; residential areas; commercial areas; large forts; industrial complexes; civic centers; rural villages; canal systems; collections of habitation and limited activity sites; irrigation systems; large farms, ranches, estates, or plantations; transportation networks; and large landscaped parks.

 

Figure 4.

Rules for Counting Resources

 

•Count all buildings, structures, sites, and objects located within the property's boundaries that are substantial in size and scale. Do not count minor resources, such as small sheds or grave markers, unless they strongly contribute to the property's historic significance.

• Count a building or structure with attached ancillary structures, covered walkways, and additions as a single unit unless the attachment was originally constructed as a separate building or structure and later connected.

• Count rowhouses individually, even though attached.

• Do not count interiors, facades, or artwork separately from the building or structure of which they are a part.

• Count gardens, parks, vacant lots, or open spaces as "sites" only if they contribute to the significance of the property.

• Count a continuous site as a single unit regardless of its size or complexity.

 

• Count separate areas of a discontiguous archeological district as separate sites.

• Do not count ruins separately from the site of which they are a part.

• Do not count landscape features, such as fences and paths, separately from the site of which they are a part unless they are particularly important or large in size and scale, such as a statue by a well-known sculptor or an extensive system of irrigation ditches.

If a group of resources, such as backyard sheds in a residential district, was not identified during a site inspection and cannot be included in the count, state that this is the case and explain why in the narrative for section 7.

For additional guidance, contact the SHPO. For the address and phone number of the appropriate SHPO, contact the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers, 444 N. Capital Street, NW, Suite 342, Washington, DC 20001-1512 or visit the following Web site http://www.nps.gov/nr/shpolist.htm

 

Figure 5.

Guidelines for Entering Functions

 

GENERAL
• Enter the most specific category and subcategory. For example, "EDUCATION/education-related housing" rather than "DOMESTIC/institutional housing" for a college dormitory.

• If no subcategory applies, enter the general category by itself. If, in addition, none of the general categories relates to the property's function, enter "OTHER:" and an appropriate term for the function.

• For properties with many functions, such as a farm, list only the principal or predominant ones, placing the most important first.

• For districts, enter the functions applying to the district as a whole, such as DOMESTIC/village site or EDUCATION/college.

• For districts, also enter the functions of buildings, sites, structures, and objects that are:
1. of outstanding importance to the district, such as a county courthouse in a commercial center (GOVERNMENT/county courthouse) or,
2. present in substantial numbers, such as apartment buildings in a residential district (DOMESTIC/multiple dwelling) or storage pits in a village site (TRADE/trade).

• For districts containing resources having different functions and relatively equal importance, such as a group of public buildings whose functions are GOVERNMENT/city hall, GOVERNMENT/courthouse, and GOVERNMENT/post office.

HISTORIC FUNCTIONS

• Enter functions for contributing resources only.

• Select functions that relate directly to the property's significance and occurred during the period of significance (see Period of Significance).

• Enter functions for extant resources only.

• Enter only functions that can be verified by research, testing, or examination of physical evidence.

• Enter functions related to the property itself, not to the occupation of associated persons or role of associated events. For example, the home of a prominent doctor is "DOMESTIC/single dwelling" not "HEALTH CARE/medical office" unless the office was at home (in which case, list both functions).

CURRENT FUNCTIONS

• Enter functions for both contributing and noncontributing resources.

• For properties undergoing rehabilitation, restoration, or adaptive reuse, enter "WORK IN PROGRESS" in addition to any functions that are current or anticipated upon completion of the work.

 

NHL Form Section 4.

 NHL Nomination Form Page 2

[image] nomination form


State/Federal Agency Certification

Preparers should leave this blank.

NHL Form Section 5.
National Park Service Certification

Preparers should leave this blank.

NHL Form Section 6.
Function or Use

Historic Function
Select one or more category and subcategory that most accurately describe the property's principal historic functions. (See Figures 5 and 6.) Enter functions for contributing resources only and for extant resources only. Select functions that relate directly to the property's significance and occurred during the period of national significance. Enter only functions that can be verified by research, testing, or examination of physical evidence.

Current Function
Select one or more category and subcategory that most accurately describe the property's most recent principal functions. Enter functions for both contributing and noncontributing resources.

Figure 6.

Data Categories for Functions and Uses

CATEGORY: DOMESTIC  
Subcategory:
Examples:

single dwelling

Examples: single dwelling rowhouse, mansion, residence, rockshelter, homestead, cave

multiple dwelling

duplex, apartment building, pueblo, rockshelter, cave

secondary structure

dairy, smokehouse, storage pit, storage shed, kitchen, garage, other dependencies

hotel

inn, hotel, motel, way station

institutional housing

military quarters, staff housing, poor house, orphanage

camp

hunting campsite, fishing camp, summer camp, forestry camp, seasonal residence, temporary habitation site, tipi rings

village site

pueblo group
CATEGORY: COMMERCE/TRADE  
Subcategory:
Examples:

business

office building

professional

architect's studio, engineering office, law office

organizational

trade union, labor union, professional association

financial institution

savings and loan association, bank, stock exchange

specialty store

auto showroom, bakery, clothing store, blacksmith shop, hardware store

department store

general store, department store, marketplace, trading post

restaurant

cafe, bar, roadhouse, tavern

warehouse

warehouse, commercial storage

trade (archeology)

cache, site with evidence of trade, storage pit
CATEGORY: SOCIAL  
Subcategory:
Examples:

meeting hall

grange; union hall; Pioneer hall; hall of other fraternal, patriotic, or political organization

clubhouse

facility of literary, social, or garden club

civic

facility of volunteer or public service organizations such as the American Red Cross
CATEGORY: GOVERNMENT  
Subcategory:
Examples:

capitol

statehouse, assembly building

city hall

city hall, town hall

correctional facility

police station, jail, prison

fire station

firehouse

government office

municipal building

diplomatic building

embassy, consulate

custom house

custom house

post office

post office

public works

electric generating plant, sewer system

courthouse

county courthouse, Federal courthouse
CATEGORY: EDUCATION  
Subcategory:
Examples:

school

schoolhouse, academy, secondary school, grammar school, trade or technical school

college

university, college, junior college

library

library

research facility

laboratory, observatory, planetarium

education-related

college dormitory, housing at boarding schools
CATEGORY: RELIGION  
Subcategory:
 

religious facility

church, temple, synagogue, cathedral, mission, temple, mound, sweathouse, kiva, dance court, shrine

ceremonial site

astronomical observation post, intaglio, petroglyph site

church school

religious academy or schools

church-related residence

parsonage, convent, rectory
CATEGORY: FUNERARY  
Subcategory:
 

cemetery

burying ground, burial site, cemetery, ossuary

graves/burials

burial cache, burial mound, grave area, crematorium

mortuary

mortuary site, funeral home, cremation
CATEGORY: RECREATION AND CULTURE  
Subcategory:
 

theater

cinema, movie theater, playhouse

auditorium

hall, auditorium

museum

museum, art gallery, exhibition hall

music facility

concert-hall, opera house, bandstand, dance hall

sports facility

gymnasium, swimming pool, tennis court, playing field, stadium

outdoor recreation

park, campground, picnic area, hiking trail,fair, amusement park, county fairground

monument/marker

commemorative marker, commemorative monument

work of art

sculpture, carving, statue, mural, rock art
CATEGORY: AGRICULTURE/SUBSISTENCE  
Subcategory:
 

processing

meatpacking plant, cannery, smokehouse, brewery, winery, food processing site, gathering site, tobacco barn

storage

granary, silo, wine cellar, storage site, tobacco warehouse, cotton warehouse

agricultural

pasture, vineyard, orchard, wheatfield, crop field marks, stone alignments, terrace, hedgerow

animal facility

hunting & kill site, stockyard, barn, chicken coop, hunting corral, hunting run, apiary

fishing facility/site

fish hatchery, fishing grounds

horticultural facility

greenhouse, plant observatory, garden

agricultural outbuilding

wellhouse, wagon shed, tool shed, barn

irrigation facility

irrigation system, canals, stone alignments, headgates, check dams

CATEGORY: INDUSTRY/PROCESSING/
EXTRACTION

 
Subcategory:
 

manufacturing facility

mill, factory, refinery, processing plant, pottery, kiln

extractive facility

coal mine, oil derrick, gold dredge, quarry, salt mine

waterworks

reservoir, water tower, canal, dam

energy facility

windmill, power plant, hydroelectric dam

communications facility

telegraph cable station, printing plant, television station, telephone company facility, satellite tracking station

processing site

shell processing site, toolmaking site, copper mining and processing site

industrial storage

warehouse
CATEGORY: HEALTH CARE  
Subcategory:
 

hospital

veteran's medical center, mental hospital, private or public hospital, medical research facility

clinic

dispensary, doctor's office

sanitarium

nursing home, rest home, sanitarium

medical business/office

pharmacy, medical supply store, doctor or dentist's office

resort

baths, spas, resort facility
CATEGORY: DEFENSE  
Subcategory:
 

arms storage

magazine, armory

fortification

fortified military or naval post, earth fortified village, palisaded village, fortified knoll or mountain top, battery, bunker

military facility

military post, supply depot, garrison fort, barrack, military camp

battle site

battlefield

coast guard facility

lighthouse, coast guard station, pier, dock, lifesaving station

naval facility

submarine, aircraft carrier, battleship, naval base

air facility

aircraft, air base, missile launching site
CATEGORY: LANDSCAPE  
Subcategory:
 

parking lot

 

park

city park, State park, national park

plaza

square, green, plaza, public common

garden

 

forest

 

unoccupied land

meadow, swamp, desert

underwater

underwater site

natural feature

mountain, valley, promontory, tree, river, island, pond, lake

street furniture/object

street light, fence, wall, shelter, gazebo, park bench

conservation area

wildlife refuge, ecological habitat
CATEGORY: TRANSPORTATION  
Subcategory:
 

rail-related

railroad, train depot, locomotive, streetcar line, railroad bridge

air-related

aircraft, airplane hangar, airport, launching site

water-related

lighthouse, navigational aid, canal, boat, ship, wharf, shipwreck

road-related (vehicular)

parkway, highway, bridge, toll gate, parking garage

pedestrian-related

boardwalk, walkway, trail
CATEGORY: WORK IN PROGRESS  
  (Use this category when work is in progress.)

 

NHL Form Section 7.
Description

Architectural Classification

Complete this item for properties having architectural or historical importance. Select one or more subcategories to describe the property's architectural styles or stylistic influences. (See Figure 7.) If none of the subcategories describes the property's style or stylistic influence, enter the category relating to the general period of time. For properties not described by any of the listed terms, including bridges, ships, locomotives and buildings and structures that are prehistoric, folk, or vernacular in character, enter "other" with the descriptive term most commonly used to classify the property by type, period, method of construction, or other characteristics.

Other: Pratt through truss;
Other: split-log cabin;
Other: Gloucester fishing schooner.

Do not enter "vernacular" because the term does not describe any specific characteristics. For properties not having any buildings or structures enter N/A. For buildings and structures not described by the listed terms or by "other" and a common term, enter "No style."

NHL Nomination Form page 3

[image] nomination form

NHL Nomination Form page 4

[image] nomination form

 

 

 

Materials

Enter one or more terms to describe the principal exterior materials of the property. (See Figure 8.) Enter only materials visible from the exterior of a building, structure, or object. Do not enter materials of interior, structural, or concealed architectural features even if they are significant. Enter both historic and nonhistoric materials. Under "other" list the principal materials of other parts of the exterior, such as chimneys, porches, lintels, cornices, and decorative elements. For historic districts, list the major building materials visible in the district, placing the most predominant ones first.

Narrative Description

Provide a narrative describing the property and its physical characteristics. (See Figure 9.) Describe the setting, buildings, and other major resources, outbuildings, surface and subsurface remains (for properties with archeological national significance), and landscape features for all contributing and noncontributing resources. The narrative must document the evolution of the property, describing major changes since its construction or period of national significance.

This section should begin with a summary paragraph that briefly describes the general characteristics of the property, such as its location and setting, type, style, method of construction, size, and significant features. The summary paragraph should create a rough sketch of the property and its site and then use subsequent paragraphs to fill in the details.

The rest of the narrative should describe the current condition of the property and indicate whether the property has historic integrity in terms of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. Clearly delineate between the original appearance and current appearance. The more extensively a property has been altered, the more thorough the description of additions, replacement materials, and other alterations should be. Photographs and sketch maps must be used to supplement the narrative. (See Additional Documentation Section for more information.)

The description should be concise, factual, and well organized. Organize the information in a logical manner by describing a building from the foundation up and from the exterior to the interior. Include specific facts and dates. The information should be consistent with the resource counts in Section 5 and the architectural classification and materials in Section 7. All of the contributing and noncontributing resources should be clearly identified and listed. Resources of state and local significance may be evaluated, but need to be clearly differentiated from those that contribute to the NHL themes and periods of significance for which the NHL is designated. The documentation must clearly distinguish which properties contribute to the national significance, and why, and which are significant at the state or local level. Resources that have national significance may also have state and locally significant values that may need to be documented in the nomination. These values must be clearly differentiated from those for which the resource is being nominated for NHL designation.

Historic districts usually require street by street description with a more detailed description of pivotal resources. Begin by outlining the general character of the group or district and then describe the individual resources one by one.

Describe the pivotal resources and the common types of resources, noting their general condition, historical appearance, and major changes. Follow a logical progression, moving from one resource to the next up and down each street in a geographical sequence or by street address.

Archeological nominations must also contain a brief description of the location and condition of previously excavated artifacts and collections made from the nominated property. This is a critical recognition of the importance of intact archeological collections to the scientific analyses and understanding of nationally significant archeological sites, both now and in the future.

Figure 7.

Data Categories for Architectural Classification

CATEGORY: NO STYLE  
   

CATEGORY: COLONIAL

 

Subcategories:

Other Stylistic Terminology:

French Colonial

 

Spanish Colonial

Mexican Baroque

Dutch Colonial

Flemish Colonial

Postmedieval

English, English Gothic; Elizabethan; Tudor; Jacobean or Jacobethan; New England Colonial; Southern Colonial

Georgian

 
CATEGORY: EARLY REPUBLIC  
Subcategories:
Other Stylistic Terminology:

Early Classical Revival

Jeffersonian Classicism; Roman Republican; Roman Revival; Roman Villa; Monumental Classicism; Regency

Federal

Adams or Adamesque

CATEGORY: MID-19TH CENTURY

 

Subcategories

Other Stylistic Terminology:

 

Early Romanesque Revival

Greek Revival

 

Gothic Revival

Early Gothic Revival

Italian Villa

 

Exotic Revival

Egyptian Revival; Moorish Revival

Octagon Mode

 
CATEGORY: LATE VICTORIAN  
Subcategories:
Other Stylistic Terminology:

 

Victorian or High Victorian Eclectic

Gothic

High Victorian Gothic; Second Gothic Revival

Italianate

Victorian or High Victorian Italianate

Second Empire

Mansard

Queen Anne

Queen Anne Revival; Queen Anne-Eastlake

Stick/Eastlake

Eastern Stick; High Victorian Eastlake

Shingle Style

 

Romanesque

Romanesque Revival; Richardsonian Romanesque

Renaissance

Renaissance Revival; Romano-Tuscan Mode; North Italian or Italian Renaissance; French Renaissance; Second Renaissance Revival
CATEGORY: LATE 19TH & 20TH CENTURY REVIVALS  

Subcategories:

Other Stylistic Terminology:

Beaux Arts

Beaux Arts Classicism

Colonial Revival

Georgian Revival

Classical Revival

Neo-Classical Revival

Tudor Revival

Jacobean or Jacobethan Revival; Elizabethan Revival

Late Gothic Revival

Collegiate Gothic

Mission/Spanish Colonial Revival

Spanish Revival; Mediterranean Revival

Italian Renaissance

 

French Renaissance

 

Pueblo

 

LATE 19TH & EARLY 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN MOVEMENTS

 
Subcategories:
Other Stylistic Terminology:

 

Sullivanesque

Prairie School

 

Commercial Style

 

Chicago

 

Skyscraper

 

Bungalow/Craftsman

Western Stick; Bungaloid
CATEGORY: MODERN MOVEMENT  

Subcategories:

Other Stylistic Terminology:

Modern Movement

New Formalism; Neo-Expressionism; Brutalism; California Style or Ranch Style; Post-Modern; Wrightian

Moderne

Modernistic; Streamlined Moderne; Art Moderne

International Style

Miesian

Art Deco

 

CATEGORY: OTHER

 

 

 
CATEGORY: MIXED  
  More than three styles from different periods (for a building only)

 

Figure 8.

Data Categories for Materials

CATEGORY: Examples:
Earth
 

Wood

Weatherboard; Shingle; Log; Plywood/particle board; Shake

Brick

 

Stone

Granite; Sandstone (including brownstone); Limestone; Marble; Slate

Metal

Iron; Copper; Bronze; Tin; Aluminum; Steel; Lead; Nickel; Cast Iron

Stucco

 
Terra cotta
 

Asphalt

 
Concrete
 
Adobe
 

Ceramic Tile

 

Glass

 

Cloth/canvas

 

Synthetics

Fiberglass; Vinyl; Rubber; Plastic

Other

 

 

Figure 9.

Guidelines for Describing Properties

 

BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES, AND OBJECTS

A. Type or form, such as dwelling, church, or commercial block.

B. Setting, including the placement or arrangement of buildings and other resources, such as in a commercial center or a residential neighborhood or detached or in a row.

C. General characteristics:

1. Overall shape of plan and arrangement of interior spaces.
2. Number of stories.
3. Number of vertical divisions or bays.
4. Construction materials, such as brick, wood, or stone, and wall finish, such as type of bond, coursing, or shingling.
5. Roof shape, such as gabled, hip, or shed.
6. Structural system, such as balloon frame, reinforced concrete, or post and beam.

D. Specific features, by type, location, number, material, and condition:

1. Porches, including verandas, porticos, stoops, and attached sheds.
2. Windows.
3. Doors.
4. Chimney.
5. Dormer.
6. Other.

E. Important decorative elements, such as finials, pilasters, barge boards, brackets, half timbering, sculptural relief, balustrades, corbelling, cartouches, and murals or mosaics.

F. Significant interior features, such as floor plans, stairways, functions of rooms, spatial relationships, wainscoting, flooring, paneling, beams, vaulting, architraves, moldings, and chimneypieces .

G. Number, type, and location of outbuildings, with dates, if known.

H. Other manmade elements, including roadways, contemporary structures, and landscape features.

I. Alterations or changes to the property, with dates, if known. A restoration is considered an alteration even if an attempt has been made to restore the property to its historic form (see L below). If there have been numerous alterations to a significant interior, also submit a sketch of the floor plan illustrating and dating the changes.

J. Deterioration due to vandalism, neglect, lack of use, or weather, and the effect it has had on the property's historic integrity.

K. For moved properties:

1. Date of move.
2. Descriptions of location, orientation, and setting historically and after the move.
3. Reasons for the move.
4. Method of moving.
5. Effect of the move and the new location on the historic integrity of the property.

L. For restored and reconstructed buildings:

1. Date of restoration or reconstruction.
2. Historical basis for the work.
3. Amount of remaining historic material and replacement material.
4. Effect of the work on the property's historic integrity.
5. For reconstructions, whether the work was done as part of a master plan.

M. For properties where landscape or open space adds to the significance or setting of the property, such as rural properties, college campuses, or the grounds of public buildings:

1. Historic appearance and current condition of natural features.
2. Land uses, landscape features, and vegetation that characterized the property during the period of significance, including gardens, walls, paths, roadways, grading, fountains, orchards, fields, forests, rock formations, open space, and bodies of water.

N. For industrial properties where equipment and machinery is intact:

1. Types, approximate date, and function of machinery.
2. Relationship of machinery to the historic industrial operations of the property.

ARCHEOLOGICAL SITES

A. Environmental setting of the property today and, if different, its environmental setting during the periods of occupation or use. Emphasize environmental features or factors related to the location, use, formation, or preservation of the site.

B. Period of time when the property is known or projected to have been occupied or used. Include comparisons with similar sites and districts that have assisted in identification.

C. Identity of the persons, ethnic groups, or archeological cultures who, through their activities, created the archeological property. Include comparisons with similar sites and districts that have assisted in identification.

D. Physical characteristics:

1. Site type, such as rockshelter, temporary camp, lithic workshop, rural homestead, or shoe factory.
2. Prehistorically or historically important standing structures, buildings, or ruins.
3. Kinds and approximate number of features, artifacts, and ecofacts, such as hearths, projectile points, and faunal remains.
4. Known or projected depth and extent of archeological deposits.
5. Known or projected dates for the period when the site was occupied or used, with supporting evidence.
6. Vertical and horizontal distribution of features, artifacts, and ecofacts.
7. Natural and cultural processes, such as flooding and refuse disposal, that have influenced the formation of the site.
8. Noncontributing buildings, structures, and objects within the site.

E. Likely appearance of the site during the periods of occupation or use. Include comparisons with similar sites and districts that have assisted in description.

F. Current and past impacts on or immediately around the property, such as modern development, vandalism, road construction, agriculture, soil erosion, or flooding.

G. Previous investigations of the property, including,

1. Archival or literature research.
2. Extent and purpose of any excavation, testing, mapping, or surface collection.
3. Dates of relevant research and field work. Identity of researchers and their institutional or organizational affiliation.
4. Important bibliographic references.
5. Repository or repositories where excavated collections are curated.

 

 

HISTORIC SITES

A. Present condition of the site and its setting.

B. Natural features that contributed to the selection of the site for the significant event or activity, such as a spring, body of water, trees, cliffs, or promontories.

C. Other natural features that characterized the site at the time of the significant event or activity, such as vegetation, topography, a body of water, rock formations, or a forest.

D. Any cultural remains or other manmade evidence of the significant event or activities.

E. Type and degree of alterations to natural and cultural features since the significant event or activity, and their impact on the historic integrity of the site.

F. Explanation of how the current physical environment and remains of the site reflect the period and associations for which the site is significant.

ARCHITECTURAL AND HISTORIC DISTRICTS

A. Natural and manmade elements comprising the district, including prominent topographical features and structures, buildings, sites, objects, and other kinds of development.

B. Architectural styles or periods represented and predominant characteristics, such as scale, proportions, materials, color, decoration, workmanship, and quality of design.

C. General physical relationship of buildings to each other and to the environment, including facade lines, street plans, squares, open spaces, density of development, landscaping, principal vegetation, and important natural features. Any changes to these relationships over time. Some of this information may be provided on a sketch map.

D. Appearance of the district during the time when the district achieved significance (see Period of Significance) and any changes or modifications since.

E. General character of the district, such as residential, commercial, or industrial, and the types of buildings and structures, including outbuildings and bridges, found in the district.

F. General condition of buildings, including alterations, additions, and any restoration or rehabilitation activities.

G. Identity of buildings, groups of buildings, or other resources that do and do not contribute to the district's significance. (See Determining Contributing and Noncontributing Resources for definitions of contributing and noncontributing resources.) If resources are classified by terms other than "contributing" and "noncontributing," clearly explain which terms denote contributing resources and which noncontributing. Provide a list of all resources that are contributing or noncontributing or identify them on the sketch map submitted with the form (see Sketch Map).

H. Most important contributing buildings, sites, structures, and objects. Common kinds of other contributing resources.

I. Qualities distinguishing the district from its surroundings.

J. Presence of any archeological resources that may yield important information with any related paleo-environmental data (see guidelines for describing archeological sites and districts).

K. Open spaces such as parks, agricultural areas, wetlands, and forests, including vacant lots or ruins that were the site of activities important in prehistory or history.

L. For industrial districts:

1. Industrial activities and processes, both historic and current, within the district; important natural and geographical features related to these processes or activities, such as waterfalls, quarries, or mines.

2. Original and other historic machinery still in place.

3. Transportation routes within the district, such as canals, railroads, and roads including their approximate length and width and the location of terminal points.

M. For rural districts:

1. Geographical and topographical features such as valleys, vistas, mountains, and bodies of water that convey a sense of cohesiveness or give the district its rural or natural characteristics.
2. Examples and types of vernacular, folk, and other architecture, including outbuildings, within the district.
3. Manmade features and relationships making up the historic and contemporary landscape, including the arrangement and character of fields, roads, irrigation systems, fences, bridges, earthworks, and vegetation.
4. The historic appearance and current condition of natural features such as vegetation, principal plant materials, open space, cultivated fields, or forests.

ARCHEOLOGICAL DISTRICTS

A. Environmental setting of the district today and, if different, its environmental setting during the periods of occupation or use. Emphasize environmental features or factors related to the location, use, formation, or preservation of the district.

B. Period of time when the district is known or projected to have been occupied or used. Include comparisons with similar sites and districts that have assisted in identification.

C. Identity of the persons, ethnic groups, or archeological cultures who occupied or used the area encompassed by the district. Include comparisons with similar sites and districts that have assisted in identification.

D. Physical characteristics:

1. Type of district, such as an Indian village with outlying sites, a group of quarry sites, or a historic manufacturing complex.
2. Cultural, historic, or other relationships among the sites that make the district a cohesive unit.
3. Kinds and number of sites, structures, buildings, or objects that make up the district.
4. Information on individual or representative sites and resources within the district (see Archeological Sites above). For small districts, describe individual sites. For large districts, describe the most representative sites individually and others in summary or tabular form or collectively as groups.
5. Noncontributing buildings, structures, and objects within the district.

E. Likely appearance of the district during the periods of occupation or use. Include comparisons with similar sites and districts that have assisted in description.

F. Current and past impacts on or immediately around the district, such as modern development, vandalism, road construction, agriculture, soil erosion, or flooding. Describe the integrity of the district as a whole and, in written or tabular form, the integrity of individual sites.

G. Previous investigations of the property, including:

1. Archival or literature research.
2. Extent and purpose of any excavation, testing, mapping, or surface collection.
3. Dates of relevant research and field work. Identity of researchers and their institutional or organizational affiliation.
4. Important bibliographic references.
5. Repository or repositories where excavated collections are curated.

 

 

 

NHL Form Section 8.
Statement of Significance

Applicable National Register Criteria

If the property has already been listed in the National Register of Historic Places, mark the criteria identified in the National Register nomination and any new criteria not already marked in the National Register nomination which apply to the national significance of the property.

Criteria Considerations

If the property was listed in the National Register with any applicable criteria considerations, mark those in addition to any new criteria considerations which apply to the national significance of the property if not covered by the National Register nomination.

National Historic Landmarks Criteria

Type in the National Historic Landmarks criteria for which the property qualifies for designation. Properties may be nationally significant for more than one criterion, but those qualifying criteria must be supported by the narrative statement of significance.

National Historic Landmarks Criteria Exceptions

Enter all National Historic Landmarks criteria exceptions which apply to the property. The criteria exceptions are a part of the NHL criteria and they set forth special standards for designating certain kinds of properties normally excluded from NHL designation. If no exceptions apply to the property, leave this section blank.

National Historic Landmarks Theme(s)

List the National Historic Landmarks theme and subtheme from The National Park Service's Thematic Framework for each criterion marked (See Appendix A). You may enter more than one nationally significant theme and subtheme but they must be supported by the narrative statement of significance. (See discussion in Chapter III.)

For a property nationally significant under Criterion 1, 3, or 5, select the theme and subtheme that relates to the historic event, ideal, or role for which the property is nationally significant. If Criterion 2 is being used, select the theme and subtheme in which the nationally significant individual made the contributions for which he or she is known or for which the property is illustrative. For a property nationally significant under Criterion 4, the themes and subthemes will most often be "Expressing Cultural Values: architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design" (for architecture); "Expressing Cultural Values: visual and performing arts" (for art); and "Expanding Science and Technology: technological applications" (for engineering). If Criterion 6 is being used, select the theme and subtheme that best describes the topic for which the site is likely to yield information.

Do not confuse the NHL theme with the historic function. Historic function relates to the practical and routine uses of a property. The theme(s) relates to the property's nationally significant contributions to the broader patterns of American history, archeology, architecture, engineering, and culture.

Areas of Significance

If the property has already been listed in the National Register of Historic Places, list those areas of significance identified in the National Register nomination in addition to those which apply to the national significance of the property if not already covered in the National Register nomination. If the property has not been listed in the National Register, select one or more areas of history in which the property is nationally significant. (See Figure 10.) Choose only areas that are supported by the narrative statement. Do not confuse area of significance with historic function which relates to the practical and routine uses of a property. Area of significance relates to a property's nationally significant contributions to the broader patterns of American history, archeology, architecture, engineering, and culture.

Historic Context

List the theme study or historic context or contexts within which the national significance of the property is being considered. This may be a theme study or historic context that has been or continues to be studied under past themes or a theme from the 1996 Thematic Framework. It may also be an area of significance or another historic context within which the property is being evaluated for NHL designation.

The classification of resources is important and fundamental to the comparative analysis necessary in making judgments of relative significance. It is also useful in determining where the property under consideration for NHL designation ranks when compared with other properties in the same theme or historical context. The NHL Survey staff and staff in the regional and support offices should be consulted for information about defining the theme or historic context and whether the property fits within a theme or historic context that has previously been studied.

You may enter more than one nationally significant theme or historic context, but they must be supported by the narrative statement of significance.

Period of National Significance

The period of national significance is the length of time when a property was associated with nationally significant events, activities, and persons, or attained the national characteristics which qualify it for designation as a National Historic Landmark. Therefore, enter the dates for one or more periods of time when the property attained this national significance. Some periods of significance are as brief as one day or year while others span many years and consist of beginning and closing dates.

Base the period of national significance on specific events directly related to the national significance of the property. For the site of a nationally significant event, the period of significance is the time when the event occurred, while the period of significance for properties associated with nationally significant historic trends is the span of time when the property actively contributed to the trend. For properties associated with nationally significant persons, the period of significance is the length of time of that association. Architecturally significant properties use the date of construction and/or the dates of any significant alterations and additions for the period of significance. For precontact properties, the period of significance is the broad span of time about which the site or district is likely to provide information. The property must possess historic integrity for all periods of national significance listed.

Continued use or activity does not necessarily justify continuing the period of significance. The period of significance is based solely upon the time when the property made the nationally significant contributions or achieved the national character on which the significance is based. Fifty years ago is used as the closing date for periods of significance where activities begun historically continued to have importance and no more specific date greater than 50 years ago can be defined to end the historic period. For some properties, such as those relating to the Cold War or the Civil Rights Movement, the period of significance may be within the last 50 years. However, if the closing date of the period of national significance is less than 50 years ago then you will have to apply Criteria Exception 8 to the property.

Nationally Significant Dates

A nationally significant date is the year when one or more major events directly contributing to the national significance of a historic property occurred. Therefore, enter the year of any events, associations, construction, or alterations that add to its national significance and contribute to qualifying the property for designation as a National Historic Landmark. A property may have several dates of significance; all of them, however, must fall within the periods of significance. In addition, the property must have historic integrity for all the significant dates entered.

The beginning and closing dates of a period of significance are "significant dates" only if they mark specific events directly related to the national significance of the property. For properties using Criterion 4, the date of construction is a significant date but list the dates of alterations only if they contribute to the national significance of the property. Some properties may not have any specific dates of significance. In these cases, enter "N/A."

NHL Nomination Form page 5[image] nomination form

NHL Nomination Form page 6

[image] nomination form

Significant Person

Complete this item only if the property is being considered under Criterion 2. Enter the full name, last name first, of the nationally significant person with whom the property is importantly associated. Do not list the name of a family, fraternal group, or other organization. Enter the names of several individuals in one family or organization only if each person is nationally significant and made nationally significant contributions for which the property is being designated. List the name of the property's architect or builder only if the property's nationally significant association is with the life of that individual, such as the nationally significant architect's home, studio, or office.

Cultural Affiliation

Complete this item only if the property is being considered under Criterion 6. Cultural affiliation is the archeological or ethnographic culture to which a collection of artifacts or resources belongs. It is generally a term given to a specific cultural group for which assemblages of artifacts have been found at several sites of the same age in the same region.

For Native American cultures, list the name commonly used to identify the cultural group (such as Hopewell or Mississippian), or list the period of time represented by the archeological remains (such as Paleo-Indian or Late Archaic).

For non-Native American historic cultures, list the ethnic background, occupation, geographical location or topography, or another term that is commonly used to identify members of the cultural group (such as Appalachian, Black Freedman, or Moravian).

For properties nationally significant for criteria besides Criterion 6, list important cultural affiliations under areas of significance.

Architect/Builder

List the full name, last name first, of the person(s) responsible for the design or construction of the property. This includes architects, artists, builders, craftsmen, designers, engineers, and landscape architects. Enter the names of architectural and engineering firms, only if the names of specific persons responsible for the design are unknown. If the property's design is derived from the stock plans of a company or government agency, list the name of the company or agency (such as the U.S. Army or the Southern Pacific Railroad). The names of the property owners are listed only if they were actually responsible for the property's design and/or construction. If the architect or builder is not known, enter "unknown."

Narrative Statement of Significance

Explain how the property meets the National Historic Landmarks criteria by drawing on facts about the history of the property and the nationally historic trends that the property reflects. (See Figure 11.) The goal of the statement is to make the case for the property's national historical significance and integrity. The statement should explain in narrative form the information which justifies the NHL criteria, the criteria exceptions, the NHL themes and historic context, the significant person(s), the period of significance, and the significant dates. This narrative should explain why the nominated property stands out among its peers. The statement should be concise, factual, well-organized, and in paragraph form. The information contained in the statement should be well-documented with proper footnotes. (Use a standard scholarly footnote style such as that found in The Chicago Manual of Style published by the University of Chicago Press or in A Manual of Style by Kate L. Turabian also published by the University of Chicago Press.) Include only information pertinent to the property and its eligibility.

The statement should begin with a summary statement of significance which states simply and clearly the reasons why the property meets the NHL criteria. Provide brief facts that explain the way in which the property was important to the history of the United States during the period of significance and mention the nationally significant themes and historic contexts to which the property relates.

Historic context is information about historic trends and properties grouped by an important theme in the history of the nation during a particular period of time. Because historic contexts are organized by theme, place, and time, they link historic properties to important historic trends. In this way, they provide a framework for determining the significance of a property and its eligibility for designation as a National Historic Landmark. A knowledge of historic contexts allows applicants to understand a historic property as a product of its time and as an illustration of aspects of heritage that may be unique, representative, or pivotal.

Identify specific associations or characteristics through which the property has acquired national significance, including historic events, activities, persons, physical features, artistic qualities, architectural styles, and archeological evidence that represent the historic contexts within which the property is important to the nation's history. Specifically state the ways the property meets the qualifying NHL criterion and any criteria exclusions.

Using the summary paragraph as an outline, make the case for national significance in the subsequent paragraphs. Begin by discussing the chronology and historic development of the property. Highlight and focus on the events, activities, associations, characteristics, and other facts that relate the property to its national historic contexts and are the basis for its meeting the NHL criteria.

For each NHL theme and historic context discuss the facts and circumstances in the property's history that led to its national significance. Make clear the connection between each theme, its corresponding criterion, and the period of significance. This discussion of the NHL themes and historic context should explain the role of the property in relationship to broad nationally historic trends, drawing on specific facts about the property. The history of the community where the property is located as it directly relates to the property should also be described in order to orient the reader to the property's surroundings and the kind of community or place where it functioned in the past. Highlight any notable events and patterns of development in the community that affected the property's national history, significance, and integrity. Describe how the property is unique, outstanding or exceptionally representative of a nationally significant historic context when compared with other properties of the same or similar period, characteristics, or associations.

The preparer should be selective about the facts presented considering whether they directly support the national significance of the property. Narrating the entire history of the property should be avoided. Rather, the statement should focus only on those events, activities, or characteristics that make the property nationally significant. Dates and proper names of owners, architects or builders, other people, and places should be given. The preparer should keep in mind the reader who will have little or no knowledge of the property and its historic context, or its location.

Values of state and local significance may be mentioned and discussed, but need to be clearly differentiated from those that contribute to the NHL themes and period of significance for which the NHL is being considered for designation. Resources that have national significance may also have state and locally significant values that may be documented in the nomination but these values also must be clearly differentiated from those for which the resource is being nominated for NHL designation.

 

Figure 10.

Data Categories for Areas of Significance

CATEGORY: AGRICULTURE  
 
Definition

 

The process and technology of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock and plants.

 

 

CATEGORY: ARCHITECTURE

Definition

 

The practical art of designing and constructing buildings and structures serve human needs.

 

 
CATEGORY: ARCHEOLOGY  

Subcategory

Definition
 
The study of prehistoric and historic cultures through excavation and the analysis of physical remains.
Prehistoric
Archeological study of aboriginal cultures before the advent of written records.

Historic-Aboriginal

Archeological study of aboriginal cultures after the advent of written records.

Historic-Non-Aboriginal

Archeological study of non-aboriginal cultures after the advent of written records.

 

 

CATEGORY: ART

 

 

Definition
  The creation of painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, and decorative arts.
CATEGORY: COMMERCE  
  Definition
  The business of trading goods, services, and commodities.
   
CATEGORY: COMMUNICATIONS  
  Definition
  The technology and process of transmitting information.
   
CATEGORY: COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT  
  Definition
  The design or development of the physical structure communities.
   
CATEGORY: CONSERVATION  
  Definition
  The preservation, maintenance, and management of natural or manmade resources.
   
CATEGORY: ECONOMICS  
  Definition
  The study of the production, distribution, and consumption of wealth; the management of monetary and other assets.
   
CATEGORY: EDUCATION  
  Definition
  The process of conveying or acquiring knowledge or skills through systematic instruction, training, or study.
   
CATEGORY: ENGINEERING  
  Definition
  The practical application of scientific principles to design, construct, and operate equipment, machinery, and structures to serve human needs.
   
CATEGORY: ENTERTAINMENT/RECREATION  
  Definition
  The development and practice of leisure activities for refreshment, diversion, amusement, or sport.
   
CATEGORY: ETHNIC HERITAGE  

Subcategory

Definition
  The history of persons having a common ethnic or racial identity.

Asian

The history of persons having origins in the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.

Black

The history of persons having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa.

European

The history of persons having origins in Europe.

Hispanic

The history of persons having origins in the Spanish-speaking areas of the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and South America.

Native American

The history of persons having origins n any of the original peoples of North America, including American Indian and American Eskimo cultural groups.

Pacific Islander

The history of persons having origins in the Pacific Islands, including Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia.

Other

The history of persons having origins in other parts of the world, such as the Middle East or North Africa.
   
CATEGORY: EXPLORATION/SETTLEMENT  
  Definition
  The investigation of unknown or little known regions; establishment and earliest development of new settlements or communities.
   
CATEGORY: HEALTH/MEDICINE  
  Definition
  The care of the sick, disabled, and handicapped; the promotion of health and hygiene.
   
CATEGORY: INDUSTRY  
  Definition
  The technology and process of managing materials, labor, and equipment to produce goods and services.
   
CATEGORY: INVENTION  
  Definition
  The art of originating by experiment or ingenuity an object, system, or concept of practical value.
   
CATEGORY: LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE  
  Definition
  The practical art of designing or arranging the land for human use and enjoyment.
   
CATEGORY: LAW  
  Definition
  The interpretation and enforcement of society's legal code.
   
CATEGORY: LITERATURE  
  Definition
  The creation of prose and poetry.
   
CATEGORY: MARITIME HISTORY  
  Definition
  The history of the exploration, fishing, navigation, and use of inland, coastal, and deep sea waters.
   
CATEGORY: MILITARY  
  Definition
  The system of defending the territory and sovereignty of a people.
   
CATEGORY: PERFORMING ARTS  
  Definition
  The creation of drama, dance, and music.
   
CATEGORY: PHILOSOPHY  
  Definition
  The theoretical study of thought, knowledge, and the nature of the universe.
   
CATEGORY: POLITICS/GOVERNMENT  
  Definition
  The enactment and administration of laws by which a nation, State, or other political jurisdiction is governed; activities related to political process.
   
CATEGORY: RELIGION  
  Definition
  The organized system of beliefs, practices, and traditions regarding mankind's relationship to perceived supernatural forces.
   
CATEGORY: SCIENCE  
  Definition
  The systematic study of natural law and phenomena.
   
CATEGORY: SOCIAL HISTORY  
  Definition
  The history of efforts to promote the welfare of society; the history of society and the life ways of its social groups.
   
CATEGORY: TRANSPORTATION  
  Definition
  The process and technology of conveying passengers or materials.
   
CATEGORY: OTHER  
  Definition
  Any area not covered by the above categories.

 

Figure 11.

Guidelines for Evaluating and Stating Significance

 

The following questions should be considered when evaluating the significance of a property and developing the statement of significance. Incorporate in the narrative the answers to the questions directly pertaining to the property's historic significance and integrity.

ALL PROPERTIES

A. What events took place on the significant dates indicated on the form, and in what ways are they important to the property?

B. In what ways does the property physically reflect its period of significance, and in what ways does it reflect changes after the period of significance?

C. What is the period of significance based on? Be specific and refer to existing resources or features within the property or important events in the property's history.

BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES AND OBJECTS

A. If the property is significant for its association with historic events, what are the historically significant events or patterns of activity associated with the property? Does the existing building, object, or structure reflect in a tangible way the important historical associations? How have alterations or additions contributed to or detracted from the resource's ability to convey the feeling and association of the significant historic period?

B. If the property is significant because of its association with an individual, how long and when was the individual associated with the property and during what period in his or her life? What were the individual's significant contributions during the period of association? Are there other resources in the vicinity also having strong associations with the individual? If so, compare their significance and associations to that of the property being documented.

C. If the property is significant for architectural, landscape, aesthetic, or other physical qualities, what are those qualities and why are they significant? Does the property retain enough of its significant design to convey these qualities? If not, how have additions or alterations contributed to or detracted from the significance of the resource?

D. Does the property have possible archeological significance and to what extent has this significance been considered?

E. Does the property possess attributes that could be studied to extract important information? For example: does it contain tools, equipment, furniture, refuse, or other materials that could provide information about the social organization of its occupants, their relations with other persons and groups, or their daily lives? Has the resource been rebuilt or added to in ways that reveal changing concepts of style or beauty?

F. If the property is no longer at its original location, why did the move occur? How does the new location affect the historical and architectural integrity of the property?

HISTORIC SITES

A. How does the property relate to the significant event, occupation, or activity that took place there?

B. How have alterations such as the destruction of original buildings, changes in land use, and changes in foliage or topography affected the integrity of the site and its ability to convey its significant associations? For example, if the forested site of a treaty signing is now a park in a suburban development, the site may have lost much of its historic integrity and may not be eligible for the National Register.

C. In what ways does the event that occurred here reflect the broad patterns of American history and why is it significant?

ARCHEOLOGICAL SITES

A. What is the cultural context in which the property is considered significant? How does the site relate to what is currently known of the region's prehistory or history and similar known sites?

B. What kinds of information can the known data categories yield? What additional kinds of information are expected to be present on the basis of knowledge of similar sites? What similarities permit comparison with other known sites?

C. What is the property's potential for research? What research questions may be addressed at the site? How do these questions relate to the current understanding of the region's archeology? How does the property contribute or have the potential for contributing important information regarding human ecology, cultural history, or cultural process? What evidence, including scholarly investigations, supports the evaluation of significance?

D. How does the integrity of the property affect its significance and potential to yield important information?

E. If the site has been totally excavated, how has the information yielded contributed to the knowledge of American cultures or archeological techniques to the extent that the site is significant for the investigation that occurred there?

F. Does the property possess resources, such as buildings or structures, that in their own right are architecturally or historically significant? If so, how are they significant?

 

ARCHITECTURAL AND HISTORIC DISTRICTS

A. What are the physical features and characteristics that distinguish the district, including architectural styles, building materials, building types, street patterns, topography, functions and land uses, and spatial organization?

B. What are the origins and key events in the historical development of the district? Are any architects, builders, designers, or planners important to the district's development?

C. Does the district convey a sense of historic and architectural cohesiveness through its design, setting, materials, workmanship, or association?

D. How do the architectural styles or elements within the district contribute to the feeling of time and place? What period or periods of significance are reflected by the district?

E. How have significant individuals or events contributed to the development of the district?

F. How has the district affected the historical development of the community, region, or State? How does the district reflect the history of the community, region, or State?

G. How have intrusions and noncontributing structures and buildings affected the district's ability to convey a sense of significance?

H. What are the qualities that distinguish the district from its surroundings?

I. How does the district compare to other similar areas in the locality, region, or State?

J. If there are any preservation or restoration activities in the district, how do they affect the significance of the district?

K. Does the district contain any resources outside the period of significance that are contributing? If so, identify them and explain their importance.

L. If the district has industrial significance, how do the industrial functions or processes represented relate to the broader industrial or technological development of the locality, region, State or nation? How important were the entrepreneurs, engineers, designers, and planners who contributed to the development of the district? How do the remaining buildings, structures, sites, and objects within the district reflect industrial production or process?

M. If the district is rural, how are the natural and manmade elements of the district linked historically or architecturally, functionally, or by common ethnic or social background? How does the open space constitute or unite significant features of the district?

N. Does the district have any resources of possible archeological significance? If so, how are they likely to yield important information? How do they relate to the prehistory or history of the district?

ARCHEOLOGICAL DISTRICTS

A. What is the cultural context in which the district has been evaluated, including its relationship to what is currently known about the area's prehistory and history and the characteristics giving the district cohesion for study?

B. How do the resources making up the district as a group contribute to the significance of the district?

C. How do the resources making up the district individually or in the representative groupings identified in section 7 contribute to the significance of the district?

D. What is the district's potential for research? What research questions may be addressed at the district? How do these questions relate to the current understanding of the region's archeology? How does the property contribute or have the potential for contributing important information regarding human ecology, cultural history, or cultural process? What evidence, including scholarly investigations, supports the evaluation of significance? Given the existence of material remains with research potential, what is the context that establishes the importance of the recoverable data, taking into account the current state of knowledge in specified topical areas?

E. How does the integrity of the district affect its significance and potential to yield important information?

F. Does the district possess resources, such as buildings or structures, that in their own right are architecturally or historically significant? If so, how are they significant?

 

NHL Form Section 9.

NHL Nomination Form page 7
[image]  nomination form


Major Bibliographic References

Bibliography

Enter the primary and secondary sources used in documenting and evaluating the national significance of the property. These include books, journal or magazine articles, newspaper articles, interviews, planning documents, historic resource studies or survey reports, prepared NHL Theme Studies, census data, correspondence, deeds, wills, business records, diaries, and other sources.

Use a standard bibliographical style such as that found in The Chicago Manual of Style published by the University of Chicago Press or in A Manual of Style by Kate L. Turabian also published by the University of Chicago Press. For all printed materials list the author, full title, location and date of publication and publisher. For articles, also list the name, volume, and date of the journal or magazine. Indicate where copies are available of unpublished manuscripts. For a phone interview or personal correspondence, state the date of the interview or correspondence, name of the interviewer or recipient of the correspondence, name and title of person interviewed or originating the correspondence, and the location of the correspondence or tape of the interview. Any established nationally historic themes or contexts that have been used to evaluate the property should also be cited.

Previous Documentation on File (NPS)

Mark an "x" in the appropriate box for any other previous NPS action involving the property being nominated. This will most often include previous listing or determination of eligibility for listing in the National Register. If the property has been recorded by the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) or the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), enter the survey number.

Primary Location of Additional Data

Mark an "x" in the box to indicate where most of the additional documentation about the property is stored. List the specific name of any repository other than the State Historic Preservation Office.

NHL form Section 10.
Geographical Data

This section defines the location and extent of the property being nominated. It also explains why the boundaries were selected.

For discontiguous districts, the preparer must provide a set of the following geographical dataCacreage, UTMs, boundary description and boundary justificationCfor each separate area of land.

Acreage of Property

Enter the number of acres comprising the property in the blank. (All discontiguous parcels should be added together.) Acreage should be accurate to the nearest whole acre. If known, record fractions of acres to the nearest tenth. If the property is substantially smaller than one acre, "less than one acre" may be used.

UTM References

Enter one or more complete unabbreviated Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) grid references to identify the exact location of the property. (All discontiguous segments should have their own individual UTM references.) For properties of less than 10 acres, enter the UTM reference for the point corresponding to the center of the property as located on an accompanying United States Geological Survey (USGS) map.

For properties of 10 or more acres, enter three or more UTM references. These references should correspond to the vertices of a polygon drawn on an accompanying USGS map. The polygon must encompass the entire boundary of the property. If the UTM references define the boundaries of the property, the polygon must correspond exactly with the property's boundaries. Label the vertices of the polygon alphabetically, beginning at the northwest corner and moving clockwise. Once the UTM reference has been determined for the point corresponding to each vertex, enter those references alphabetically on the form.

If the property is linear of 10 or more acres, such as a railroad, canal, highway, or trail, enter three or more UTM references which correspond to points along a line drawn on the accompanying USGS map indicating the course of the property. The points should be marked and labeled alphabetically along the line and should correspond to the beginning, each major shift in direction of the line, and the end. Once the UTM reference has been determined for each point, enter the references alphabetically on the form.

 

Figure 12.

Guidelines for Selecting Boundaries

 

ALL PROPERTIES

•Carefully select boundaries to encompass, but not to exceed, the full extent of the significant resources and land area making up the property.

• The area to be registered should be large enough to include all historic features of the property, but should not include "buffer zones" or acreage not directly contributing to the significance of the property.

• Leave out peripheral areas of the property that no longer retain integrity, due to subdivision, development, or other changes.

• "Donut holes" are not allowed. No area or resources within a set of boundaries may be excluded from listing in the National Register. Identify nonhistoric resources within the boundaries as noncontributing.

• Use the following features to mark the boundaries:

1. Legally recorded boundary lines.
2. Natural topographic features, such as ridges, valleys, rivers, and forests.
3. Manmade features, such as stone walls; hedgerows; the curblines of highways, streets, and roads; areas of new construction.
4. For large properties, topographic features, contour lines, and section lines marked on USGS maps.

BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES AND OBJECTS

•Select boundaries that encompass the entire resource, with historic and contemporary additions. Include any surrounding land historically associated with the resource that retains its historic integrity and contributes to the property's historic significance.

• For objects, such as sculpture, and structures, such as ships, boats, and railroad cars and locomotives, the boundaries may be the land or water occupied by the resource without any surroundings.

• For urban and suburban properties that retain their historic boundaries and integrity, use the legally recorded parcel number or lot lines.

• Boundaries for rural properties may be based on:

1. A small parcel drawn to immediately encompass the significant resources, including outbuildings and associated setting, or
2. Acreage, including fields, forests, and open range, that was associated with the property historically and conveys the property's historic setting. (This area must have historic integrity and contribute to the property's historic significance.)

HISTORIC SITES

• For historic sites, select boundaries that encompass the area where the historic events took place. Include only portions of the site retaining historic integrity and documented to have been directly associated with the event.

HISTORIC AND ARCHITECTURAL DISTRICTS

• Select boundaries to encompass the single area of land containing the significant concentration of buildings, sites, structures, or objects making up the district. The district's significance and historic integrity should help determine the boundaries. Consider the following factors:

1. Visual barriers that mark a change in the historic character of the area or that break the continuity of the district, such as new construction, highways, or development of a different character.
2. Visual changes in the character of the area due to different architectural styles, types or periods, or to a decline in the concentration of contributing resources.
3. Boundaries at a specific time in history, such as the original city limits or the legally recorded boundaries of a housing subdivision, estate, or ranch.
4. Clearly differentiated patterns of historical development, such as commercial versus residential or industrial.

 

• A historic district may contain discontiguous elements only under the following circumstances:

1. When visual continuity is not a factor of historic significance, when resources are geographically separate, and when the intervening space lacks significance: for example, a cemetery located outside a rural village.
2. When manmade resources are interconnected by natural features that are excluded from the National Register listing: for example, a canal system that incorporates natural waterways.
3. When a portion of a district has been separated by intervening development or highway construction and when the separated portion has sufficient significance and integrity to meet the National Register criteria.

ARCHEOLOGICAL SITES AND DISTRICTS

• The selection of boundaries for archeological sites and districts depends primarily on the scale and horizontal extent of the significant features. A regional pattern or assemblage of remains, a location of repeated habitation, a location or a single habitation, or some other distribution of archeological evidence, all imply different spatial scales. Although it is not always possible to determine the boundaries of a site conclusively, a knowledge of local cultural history and related features such as site type can help predict the extent of a site. Consider the property's setting and physical characteristics along with the results of archeological survey to determine the most suitable approach.

• Obtain evidence through one or several of the following techniques:

1. Subsurface testing, including test excavations, core and auger borings, and observation of cut banks.
2. Surface observation of site features and materials that have been uncovered by plowing or other disturbance or that have remained on the surface since deposition.
3 . Observation of topographic or other natural features that may or may not have been present during the period of significance.
4. Observation of land alterations subsequent to site formation that may have affected the integrity of the site.
5. Study of historical or ethnographic documents, such as maps and journals.

• If the techniques listed above cannot be applied, set the boundaries by conservatively estimating the extent and location of the significant features. Thoroughly explain the basis for selecting the boundaries in the boundary justification.

• If a portion of a known site cannot be tested because access to the property has been denied by the owner, the boundaries may be drawn along the legal property lines of the portion that is accessible, provided that portion by itself has sufficient significance to meet the National Register criteria and the full extent of the site is unknown.

• Archeological districts may contain discontiguous elements under the following circumstances:

1. When one or several outlying sites has a direct relationship to the significance of the main portion of the district, through common cultural affiliation or as related elements of a pattern of land use, and
2. When the intervening space does not have known significant resources.

(Geographically separate sites not forming a discontiguous district may be nominated together as individual properties within a multiple property submission.)

 

Verbal Boundary Description

Describe accurately and precisely the boundaries of the property. (See Figure 13.) (Each discontiguous segment should have its own verbal boundary description.) The preparer may use a legal parcel number; a block and lot number; a sequence of metes and bounds; the dimensions of a parcel of land fixed upon a given point such as the intersection of two streets, a natural feature, or a manmade structure; or a narrative using street names, property lines, geographical features, and other lines of convenience. A map drawn to a scale of at least 1" = 200 feet may be used in place of a verbal boundary description. When using a map, note on the nomination form under this heading that the boundaries are indicated on the accompanying base map and give the title of the map. The map must clearly indicate the boundaries of the property in relationship to standing structures or natural or manmade features such as rivers, highways, or shorelines. The map must show the scale and a north arrow.

Boundary Justification

Provide a brief and concise explanation of the reasons for selecting the boundaries. (For discontiguous districts, explain how the property meets the conditions for a discontiguous district as well as how the boundaries were selected for each area.) The reasons should be based on the property's historical associations or attributes and high integrity. Carefully select the boundaries to encompass, but not to exceed, the full extent of the nationally significant resources and land area making up the property. The area should be large enough to include all historic features of the property, but should not include "buffer zones" or acreage not directly contributing to the national significance of the property. Leave out peripheral areas of the property that no longer retain integrity. Also, "donut holes" are not allowed. No area or resources within a set of boundaries may be excluded from the NHL designation. Identify nonhistoric resources within the boundaries as noncontributing. Properties of state or local significance may be incorporated into an NHL boundary, and listed as noncontributing for the NHL designation, only when they are located between components of the nationally significant resource and their exclusion would require an inappropriate use of a discontiguous landmark boundary.

The nature of the property, the irregularity of the boundaries, and the methods used to determine the boundaries will determine the complexity and length of the boundary justification. A paragraph or more may be needed where boundaries are very irregular, where large portions of historic acreage have been lost, or where a district's boundaries are ragged because of new construction. Properties with substantial acreage will require more explanation than those confined to small lots. Boundaries for archeological properties often call for longer justifications as they will refer to the kinds of methodology employed, the distribution of known sites, the reliability of survey-based predictions, and the amount of unsurveyed acreage.

 

Figure 13.

Guidelines for Verbal Boundary Description

 

• A map drawn to a scale of at least 1" = 200 feet may be used in place of a verbal description. When using a map, note under the heading "verbal boundary description" that the boundaries are indicated on the accompanying base map. The map must clearly indicate the boundaries of the property in relationship to standing structures or natural or manmade features such as rivers, highways, or shorelines. Plat, local planning, or tax maps may be used. Maps must include the scale and a north arrow.

The boundary of Livermore Plantation is shown as the dotted line on the accompanying map entitled "Survey, Livermore Plantation, 1958."

• For large properties whose boundaries correspond to a polygon, section lines, or contour lines on the USGS map, the boundaries marked on the USGS map may be used in place of a verbal boundary description. In this case, simply note under the heading "verbal boundary description" that the boundary line is indicated on the USGS map. If USGS quadrangle maps are not available, provide a map of similar scale and a careful and accurate description including street names, property lines, or geographical features that delineate the perimeter of the boundary.

The boundary of the nominated property is delineated by the polygon whose vertices are marked by the following UTM reference points: A 18 313500 4136270, B 18 312770 4135940, C 18 313040 4136490.

• To describe only a portion of a city lot, use fractions, dimensions, or other means.

The south _ of Lot 36
The eastern 20 feet of Lot 57

• If none of the options listed above are feasible, describe the boundaries in a narrative using street names, property lines, geographical features, and other lines of convenience. Begin by defining a fixed reference point and proceed by describing the perimeter in an orderly sequence, incorporating both dimensions and direction. Draw boundaries that correspond to rights-of-way to one side or the other but not along the centerline.

 

Beginning at a point on the east bank of the Lazy River and 60' south of the center of Maple Avenue, proceed east 150' along the rear property lines of 212-216 Maple Avenue to the west curbline of Main Street. Then proceed north 150' along the west curbline of Main Street, turning west for 50' along the rear property line of 217 Maple Avenue. Then proceed north 50' to the rear property line of 215 Maple Avenue, turning west for 100' to the east bank of the Lazy River. Then proceed south along the riverbank to the point of origin.

• For rural properties where it is difficult to establish fixed reference points such as highways, roads, legal parcels of land, or tax parcels, refer to the section grid appearing on the USGS map if it corresponds to the actual boundaries.

NW 1/4, SE 1/4, NE 1/4, SW 1/4, Section 28, Township 35, Range 17

• For rural properties less than one acre, the description may be based on the dimensions of the property fixed upon a single point of reference.

The property is a rectangular parcel measuring 50 x 100 feet, whose northwest corner is 15 feet directly northwest of the northwest corner of the foundation of the barn and whose southeast corner is 15 feet directly southeast of the southeast corner of the foundation of the farmhouse.

• For objects and structures, such as sculpture, ships and boats, railroad locomotives or rolling stock, and aircraft, the description may refer to the extent or dimensions of the property and give its location.

The ship at permanent berth at Pier 56. The statue whose boundaries form a circle with a radius of 17.5 feet centered on the statue located in Oak Hill Park.

 

NHL Form Section 11.

NHL Nomination Form page 8
[image] nomination form


Form Prepared By
This section identifies the person who prepared the form and his/her affiliation. This person is responsible for the information contained in the form and may be contacted if a question arises about the form or if additional information is needed.

ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION

United States Geological Survey (USGS) Map. An original USGS map(s) must accompany every nomination. Use a 7.5 or 15 minute series USGS map. Do not submit fragments or copies of USGS maps because they cannot be checked for UTM references. On the map, in pencil only, locate either the single UTM reference point (for properties of less than 10 acres), the polygon and its vertices encompassing the boundaries (for properties of 10 or more acres), or the line and reference points indicating the course of the property (for linear properties). Also, identify the name of the property, the location of the property, and the UTM references entered in Section 10.

Sketch Map. Submit at least one detailed map or sketch map for districts and for properties containing a substantial number of sites, structures, or buildings. Plat books, insurance maps, bird's-eye views, district highway maps, and hand-drawn maps may be used. Sketch maps need not be drawn to a precise scale, unless they are also used in place of a verbal boundary description.

The original maps should be folded to fit into a folder approximately 8 1/2 by 11 inches. If the original map(s) is larger than 8 1/2 by 11 inches, a copy must also be submitted that has been reduced to such size. This copy will be used for the photocopy reproduction of the map to accompany the nomination when it is sent out for comment and for review by the parties of notification and the various NPS review bodies. The information on the maps should be indicated by coding, crosshatching, numbering, or other graphic techniques. Do not use color because it is expensive to reproduce by photocopying.

The maps should display:

the boundaries of the property, carefully delineated;

the names of streets or highway numbers, including those bordering the property;

a north arrow and approximate scale, if done to scale;

names or numbers of parcels that correspond to the description of the resources in Section 7;

contributing buildings, sites, structures, and objects, keyed to Section 7;

noncontributing buildings, sites, structures, and objects keyed to Section 7; and

other natural features or land uses covering substantial acreage or having historical significance such as forests, fields, rivers, lakes, etc.

Maps for archeological sites and districts should also include the location and extent of disturbances, including previous excavations; the location of specific significant features and artifact loci; and the distribution of sites if it is an archeological district.

If the resource is a single building, or a building or buildings are major contributing resources, floor plans of the major levels of the building may also be required. These need not be done to scale or by a professional architect; hand-drawn floor plans are acceptable. Floor plans not only assist in making sense of the Section 7 description of the building, but also aid in determining integrity. Therefore, the floor plans should show clearly any structural changes such as new or sealed door or window openings, and additions or removals such as porches, fireplaces, stairs, or interior partition walls.

Photographs. Each nomination must be accompanied by clear and descriptive black and white photographs. The photographs should give an honest visual representation of the historic integrity and significant features of the property. They should illustrate the qualities discussed in the descriptive section and the statement of significance. Submit as many photographs as needed to depict the current condition and significant aspects of the property. Include representative views of both contributing and noncontributing resources. Prints of historic photographs may be particularly useful in illustrating the historic integrity of properties that have undergone alterations or changes.

For buildings, structures or objects submit views that show the principal facades and the environment or setting in which the property is located. Include views of major interior spaces, outbuildings, or landscaping features such as gardens. Additions, alterations, and intrusions should appear in the photographs.


[photo]
Line Drawing: West Baden Springs Hotel, West Baden Springs, Indiana Built in 1901-1902 and the focus of a spa town, the 708-room, brick and concrete, six-story, sixteen-sided structure surrounds a vast circular atrium called the "Pompeian Court." The court is covered with a steel and glass dome that was the world's largest when it was built. This Historic American Buildings Survey line drawing shows the structural achievement of the building.

For districts submit photographs representing the major building types and styles, any pivotal buildings and/or structures, representative noncontributing resources, and any important topographical or spatial elements which define the character of the district. Streetscapes, landscapes, or aerial views are recommended. If the streetscapes and other views clearly illustrate the significant historical and architectural qualities of the district, individual views of buildings are not necessary.

For sites submit photographs that depict the condition of the site and any above-ground or surface features and disturbances. At least one photograph should show the physical environment and configuration of the land taking up the site. For archeological sites, include drawings or photographs that illustrate artifacts that have been recovered from the site.


[photo] Historic photograph: Hercules tug, San Francisco, California Located today at the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, this last remaining, largely unaltered, early-20th century, ocean-going steam tugboat served on the West Coast towing logs, sailing vessels, and disabled ships until 1962. This historic photograph shows Hercules at John H. Dialogue's shipyard in Camden, New Jersey in January, 1908, prior to its maiden voyage that same year through the Straits of Magellan to San Francisco.

Photographs must be unmounted. (Do not affix the photographs to forms by staples, clips, glue or any other material.) They must be high in quality, especially for reproductive purposes. Photos of 8 x 10 inches are strongly preferred and photos smaller than 4 x 6 inches are not acceptable. The photographs should be labeled in pencil (preferably with soft lead) on the back side of the photograph. The information should include 1) the name of the property, or for districts, the name of the district followed by the name of the building or street address; 2) the city (or county) and state where the property is located; 3) a description of the view; 4) the name of the photographer; 5) the date of the photograph; and 6) the number of the photograph.


[photo]
Aerial photograph: Fort Mifflin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania An aerial view of the fort begun in 1772 by the British and captured during the Revolution by American forces. Evacuated and burned during the British occupation of Philadelphia, Fort Mifflin, on Mud Island in the Delaware River, was rebuilt during John Adam's administration, manned in the War of 1812, and eventually served as a Confederate prison during the Civil War. Aerial views can show site plans and resource relationships.

 

 

An alternative form of labeling is to use a separate sheet. Label the photographs by name of property, location and photograph number. List the remaining items above on a separate sheet, identifying the number of each photograph and each item. If there is information common to all of the photographs, such as the photographer's name or the date of the photographs, that may be listed once on the separate sheet with a statement that it applies to all photographs.

For a large or complicated property, the photographs may be keyed to a site map or floor plan to aid in identifying and orienting the photographic views. The map used to locate the photographs may be an exact copy of the site map or floor plan that is provided as outlined above, but this photographic locator map should be a separate document. This separate map requirement is to aid the NHL Survey in its preparation of the nomination for duplication for distribution to the NPS review bodies and the various parties who are provided notification of a pending nomination.

All photographs submitted to the NPS with a NHL nomination become a part of the public record and the photographer grants permission to the NPS to use the photograph for duplication, display, distribution, publicity, audio-visual presentations, and all forms of publication which may include publication on the Internet.

Slides. All NHL nominations must also be accompanied by color slides. These are to be used in the presentation of the property to the National Park System Advisory Board and will be retained by the NHL Survey to be used for publications, publicity, talks, and other audio-visual purposes. There should be at least 6 to 12 slides and they should show the same types of representative views as the black and white photographs including exterior and interior shots. There should be a list of the slides by number and a description of the view. The slides themselves should have the name of the property, location, date of the slide, and slide number written on the edge of the slide with permanent marker.

Slides submitted to the NPS with a NHL nomination become a part of the public record and the photographer grants permission to the NPS to use the slides for duplication, display, distribution, publicity, audio-visual presentations, and all forms of publication which may include publication on the Internet.

PROPERTY OWNERS AND OTHER PARTIES OF NOTICE

The NPS will also need the names and addresses of all property owners within the proposed NHL boundary. The list of owners shall be obtained from official land or tax records, whichever is most appropriate, within 90 days of the beginning of the notification period. (The notification period begins no less than 60 days prior to the Advisory Board meeting at which the property will be considered.) If in any state the land or tax record is not the appropriate list an alternative source of owners may be used. The name, title, and address of the highest elected local official of the jurisdiction in which the property is located, such as a mayor or the chairman of the board of county commissioners, must also be provided. This information is used to notify these parties of the proposed consideration for designation of the property as an NHL.

If the property has more than 50 property owners, individual names are not needed. The preparer will provide the NHL Survey with the name(s) of one or more local newspapers of general circulation in the area in which the potential NHL is located. The NHL Survey will then provide a general notice of the potential designation through a published advertisement in the legal notice section of the named newspaper(s). It would also be of help if the preparer would arrange for a public location (usually a library, historical society, or courthouse) where copies of the nomination could be placed for public review. This information would then be given in the general newspaper notification.

 

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