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National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Waverley Country Club Clubhouse
Reference Number 13000118
State Oregon
County Clackamas
Town Portland
Street Address 1100 SE Waverly Drive
Multiple Property Submission Name
Status Listed 3/27/2013
Areas of Significance ARCHITECTURE
Link to full file http://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/13000118.pdf
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The Waverlely Country-Club Clubhouse, located in unincorporated Clackamas County, Oregon , is significant locally and eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion C in the category of Architecture. The building embodies the distinctive characteristics of a building type as an excellent and largely intact example of the country-club clubhouse. In the mid-to-late 19th century, social clubs appeared in most major cities; Portland had the Arlington Club (1867) and later the University Club (1897). In some instances, clubs were associated with sports; in Portland, the example is the Multnomah Athletic Club, founded in 1891. By the turn of the century, with the confluence of new transportation modes, particularly the automobile, and the rise of the popularity of golf, the club concept was translated into a summer club or more appropriately titled, the country club. Typically, these clubs were organized along the lines of city clubs, combining exclusive membership, social activities, and sport activities. Unlike the city clubs, however, women and families were not excluded but often actively involved. As the concept blossomed, the clubhouse became the keystone of the club, with facilities not only to support the sporting activities but also dining-rooms , ballrooms, card rooms , and the like. Typically, these clubhouses also included guest rooms to accommodate members and their families for overnight stays. As the country-club grew in prestige, new clubhouses required the skills and reputation of professional architects. Waverley, built in 1913, fully embodies this building type and is the earliest extant example of the clubhouse in Oregon.

 

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria