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National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Passionist Fathers Monastery
Reference Number 13000048
State Illinois
County Cook
Town Chicago
Street Address 5700 North Harlem Avenue, Chicago, IL
Multiple Property Submission Name N/A
Status Listed 03/06/2013
Areas of Significance Architecture
Link to full file http://www.nps.gov/nr/feature/places/pdfs/13000048.pdf
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The Passionist Fathers Monastery at 5700 North Harlem Avenue, designed by Chicago architect Joseph Molitor and completed in 1910, is locally significant under National Register Criterion C for architecture as a fine example of an early twentieth century monastery with Classical, Baroque, and Romanesque-style detailing, and as one of the largest and most prominent religious structures in the Chicago community of Norwood Park. The overall design and craftsmanship of the monastery is reflected in the intricate stone and brick detailing seen throughout the building. The Classical elements at the base of the building , including the monumental stone entrance surround, rusticated water table and substantial stringcourse, are complimented by the Baroque-style gable above the main entrance and the row of round arched windows that give the impression of an arcade along the third story. These stylistic and architectural features are indicative of the work of Chicago architect Joseph Molitor, who was a prolific designer of ecclesiastical buildings throughout the city.

 

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria