• A hiker enjoys the view along the North Country Trail in New York.

    North Country

    National Scenic Trail MI,MN,ND,NY,OH,PA,WI

Frequently Asked Questions Page 3

WHO BUILDS AND MAINTAINS THE TRAIL?

Development and maintenance of the Trail is a cooperative effort of many public and private agencies. Volunteer members of the North Country Trail Association and its affiliates build most segments of the trail and perform the bulk of patrol and routine maintenance. They will clear obstructions and brush, maintain signs, mow the corridor periodically, and make any necessary repairs to bridges, stiles, or erosion control devices. The NCTA and its affiliates welcome volunteers to “Adopt" a certain trail segment.

WHO PROVIDES LAW ENFORCEMENT ON THE TRAIL?

Law enforcement along the trail is provided by the County Sheriffs Department and others that have legal jurisdiction over the areas through which the trail passes.

HOW DO I GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE TRAIL?

The National Park Service North Country Trail Office can answer questions regarding general trail information and management. The best source of detailed trail information for the trail is the North Country Trail Association. They can provide detailed maps for trip planning, as well as local contact information regarding the segments of the trail that you wish to hike.

ARE THERE CAMPSITES FOR THE TRAIL?

Many areas along the North Country NST allow camping especially in less developed areas. Camping policies are set by the local landowner or land manager. Most National Forests and State Forests permit dispersed camping along the trail as long as proper separation is maintained from the trail and water sources. In some areas, designated campsites or campgrounds must be used. It is best to contact the land managers when you are planning your hike to be sure that you understand local regulations. Also, conditions may vary because of season or local fire danger. Be sure that you do not camp on private property, unless invited to do so.

IS DRINKING WATER READILY AVAILABLE?

It is best to plan to filter or treat water found along the trail. In urban areas, parks and public facilities have potable water. In more rural areas, it is best to check local trail maps for locations of water sources. While finding water is not usually a problem along the route of the North Country NST, water for dirniking should always be filtered.

Did You Know?

Trail head picture in the fall at the Chequamegon National Forest

That the North Country National Scenic Trail was named for a trail in Wisconsin's Chequamegon National Forest?