• View from Sourdough Mountain Overlook  A view looking down onto Diablo Lake. Photo Credit: NPS/Michael Silverman, 2010.

    North Cascades

    National Park Washington

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  • Ross Dam Haul Road Repair (2014)

    A short segment of the Ross Dam Haul Road between the Diablo Lake trail suspension bridge and the tunnel remains closed to public use due to ongoing repair and rehab work on a portion originally damaged during a March 2010 landslide. More »

  • Notice of Planned Work - Cascade River Road (Fall 2014)

    The Cascade River Road will be closed from September 8 until late October 2014 to all public use (including foot, bicycle, and vehicle traffic) at the Eldorado gate (3 miles from road's terminus) in order to perform permanent road and culvert repairs. More »

Golden Access Pass

Access Pass

America the beautiful access pass

United States citizens or permanent residents who are blind or permanently disabled may qualify for the Access Pass. This lifetime entrance pass admits the pass holder and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle free of charge to national parks, monuments, historic sites, recreation areas, and national wildlife refuges that charge an entrance fee. The pass also provides a 50% discount on federal use fees charged for facilities and services such as camping, swimming, parking, and boat launching (some restrictions may apply). To obtain a pass bring proof of medically determined permanent disability or eligibility for receiving benefits under federal law or state vocational agency to any federal fee area. Also available is the Senior Pass for United States citizens or permanent residents over the age of 62. This pass costs ten dollars and provides the same benefits as an Access Pass.

Did You Know?

Grizzly bear track in North Cascades National Park (1989). Photo Credit: NPS/NOCA/Roger Christophersen

Grizzly bear tracks can be a reliable indicator of species? Grizzly bear and black bear forepaw tracks are distinct from one another and often times better than a photo of the bear to confirm an observation. So don't just look up, look down.