• View from Sourdough Mountain Overlook  A view looking down onto Diablo Lake. Photo Credit: NPS/Michael Silverman, 2010.

    North Cascades

    National Park Washington

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  • Lone Mountain Fire - National Park Service Trail Closures

    The Lone Mountain Fire in North Cascades National Park is approximately 5 mi NW of Stehekin in the Boulder Creek drainage. Boulder Creek Trail is closed. More »

  • USFS Access Road and Trail Closures

    The following USFS trails providing backcountry access to the park service complex are closed due to Lone Mountain and Carlton Complex Fires: Twisp Pass, South Creek, Reynolds Creek, War Creek, Summit. The Twisp River Road is closed west of Eagle Creek. More »

Spring Artist in Residence-David Boye

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Date: May 30, 2008

Guitar Composer David Boye to Give Public Presentations

May 31 at 3:00 p.m. – North Cascades National Park Visitor Center near Newhalem, State Route 20, milepost 120

June 3 at 12:00 p.m. – North Cascades National Park Headquarters in Sedro-Woolley, 810 State Route 20

North Cascades National Park Artist-in-Residence, guitar composer David Boye will share his creative process during these two free public programs. His first influences were acoustic artists like Leo Kottke, John Fahey, Peter Lang, and later, Michael Hedges. He has since crisscrossed many paths and has performed many different kinds of music, including blues, rock, and jazz. He has now returned full circle to his original musical inspiration, instrumental acoustic guitar.

Mr. Boye will discuss the various fundamental guitar techniques and technological advances he uses to compose with, demonstrating some of the tools that aid the creative process. He also plans to improvise a brand new composition while narrating as he plays so that the audience can watch the creative process "in action."

"North Cascades National Park offers both an exciting opportunity and a unique challenge to an artist," said Mr. Boye. "As a source of limitless inspiration it is unequaled. The visions and wonders of the park such as the spectacular vistas, the mountain spires, the dense forests and remote wilderness, the abundant and magnificent wildlife, and the rich history created by the Native Americans and homesteaders are a creative artist’s dream. Yet the challenge of this environment is to not take it for granted. The timeless beauty and continuity of the park can become almost quaint to a visitor. The role of the artist in a place such as North Cascades National Park is to enhance and expand on its beauty in very personal ways that would allow the casual visitor to see with different eyes."

Mr. Boye plans to use this residency to achieve a long-time goal: to write an entire set of pieces based around a specific theme – creating several individual compositions based on different ideas inspired by my surroundings. "It could be anything: a thunderstorm, the flight of a certain bird, the way the light changes so much at dawn, the sound of the automobile’s encroachment, the jigsaw peaks of the mountains, or the flowers of a backwoods trail," said Mr. Boye. "Anything that strikes me as unique to that day and that moment in the park will be the inspiration."

During these presentations, Mr. Boye will discuss his impressions of the park as a first time visitor and as a source of inspiration. He will bring specific examples of the ideas he has begun to develop, and how he plans on molding them further.

Mr. Boye is part of a national program that invites artists to immerse themselves in the national parks and their people so that visitors, staff, and neighbors may explore the meanings and significance of park resources in new and unique ways through presentations, workshops, or performances.

Additional information about the Artist-in-Residence program is available at:

http://www.nps.gov/archive/volunteer/air.htm

Did You Know?

Grizzly bear track in North Cascades National Park (1989). Photo Credit: NPS/NOCA/Roger Christophersen

Grizzly bear tracks can be a reliable indicator of species? Grizzly bear and black bear forepaw tracks are distinct from one another and often times better than a photo of the bear to confirm an observation. So don't just look up, look down.