• View from Sourdough Mountain Overlook  A view looking down onto Diablo Lake. Photo Credit: NPS/Michael Silverman, 2010.

    North Cascades

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Notice of Planned Work and Road Closure- Cascade River Road (Beginning Sept. 8, 2014)

    The Cascade River Road will be closed from September 8 until late October 2014 to all public use (including foot, bicycle, and vehicle traffic) at the Eldorado gate (3 miles from road's terminus) in order to perform permanent road and culvert repairs. More »

  • Lone Mountain Fire - National Park Service Trail Closures

    The Lone Mountain Fire in North Cascades National Park is approximately 5 mi NW of Stehekin in the Boulder Creek drainage. Boulder Creek Trail is closed. More »

  • Closure of Adjacent U.S. Forest Service Road and Trails that Access North Cascades NP Complex

    The Twisp River Road is closed west of Eagle Creek. The following USFS trails are closed due to the Lone Mountain 1, Little Bridge, and Carlton Complex Fires: War Creek, South Creek, Twisp Pass, Reynolds Creek. More »

Trees and Shrubs

Conifers – the Cone Bearers – dominate the forests of the North Cascades. They span the elevation ranges from sea level to the alpine zone, sheltering the low valleys and clinging to the thin mineral soils of the high peaks.

The conifers are often referred to as evergreens because of their characteristic needle or scale-like leaves that persist throughout the year. Yet, two species of larch are deciduous – dropping their needle leaves in the fall after turning a beautiful soft shade of gold.

In the North Cascades conifers define the major forest types, but adding to their complexity are many species of deciduous broad-leaved trees. Species of maple, poplar, and alder grow in the natural openings caused by disturbances to the upper canopy. This happens when large trees are blown over by wind or die of disease. Broad-leaved trees also grow along the edges of streams and rivers where there is more available light.

Woody shrubs, both coniferous and deciduous, grow in the understory of these forests providing shelter and food for wildlife. Many birds such as the rufous hummingbird also use shrubs for nesting. Shrubs are also important along stream corridors where their shade helps to keep water temperatures from getting too high for fish, particularly salmon, and other aquatic fauna.

What is the difference between a shrub and a tree?

Generally, trees are over 20 feet tall and have trunks more than 2 inches in diameter at 4.5 feet about the ground. Shrubs are smaller than trees and often have many small, woody, bark covered stems rising from the base.

 

Additional Resources:
Tree Checklist
(PDF 82 kb)

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Stephen Mather Wilderness comprises 93% of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex. About 400 miles of trail provide access to this rugged Wilderness.