• View from Sourdough Mountain Overlook  A view looking down onto Diablo Lake. Photo Credit: NPS/Michael Silverman, 2010.

    North Cascades

    National Park Washington

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Diablo Lake To Be Drawn Down Three Feet on Sept. 17 and Early Oct., Trailer-Launched Boats Affected

    On September 17 and October 1-15 Diablo Lake will be drawn down 3 vertical feet for facility repairs. During the drawdown, boats with trailers will not be able to launch or take boats off the water. Hand-launched vessels will still be able to launch. More »

  • Cascade River Road will be open as normal through fall/winter 2014

    Cascade River Rd. will be open in 2014 until snow conditions make it impassable to vehicles, as normal. The road closure that was planned to begin September 8 has been postponed beyond 2014 due to unforeseen circumstances. More »

  • Lone Mountain Fire - National Park Service Trail Closures

    The Lone Mountain Fire in North Cascades National Park is approximately 5 mi NW of Stehekin in the Boulder Creek drainage. Boulder Creek Trail is closed. More »

Black Bears

Over one-third of 1,586 “black” bears observed in the North Cascades ranged from nearly white to dark brown. Regardless their color, black bears lack grizzly bears’ prominent shoulder hump and long, “rototiller” front claws. With short, curved claws like grappling hooks and powerful muscles in their rears and hind legs, black bears are agile tree climbers.

When not part of a family group black bears are usually solitary. Where food is abundant several bears may feed near each other. In such settings social “etiquette” dictates that dominant bears (large adult males and some adult females) feed in the most food-abundant areas. Younger bears feed at safe distances from their elders.

 

Black bears are omnivores, eating berries, roots, grasses and other plant matter, insects, small mammals, carrion and fish.

Females reach sexual maturity at 5 to 9 years of age. Mating usually takes place in July. Pairs may come together for a few hours or several days, copulating many times. Cubs are born in their mother's winter den in January or February. Cubs generally remain with their mother for a year and a half before venturing out on their own.

Like people, bears are curious, intelligent and potentially dangerous. But many bears die each year because people are afraid of them, and/or have not learned how to share habitat with them. By respecting bears and learning proper behavior in bear habitat, people can learn to live and recreate safely among bears.

 

In the North Cascades you are sharing a place which is home to bears. Most people who see a bear in the wild consider it the highlight of their trip. The presence of these majestic creatures is a reminder of how privileged we are to share some of the country's dwindling wilderness. You can do your part and also reduce your risk by taking the measures described in this link.

Please report all bear sightings to a park ranger. Note the location of the sighting, length of observation, distance from the bear, and description of the bear and its activity or behavior.

Did You Know?

Long horned beetle

There are more insects in the Park than any other group of animals; in fact, 95% of all animal species on earth are insects. Take your time to explore the breathtaking world of butterflies, beetles, and bugs. More...