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National Park Service Press Release
National Park Service Honors Employees for Cultural Resource Work
For Immediate Release:
November 25, 2013
Contact(s):   Mike Litterst, 202-513-0354

Randy Biallas, 202-354-2061


National Park Service Honors Employees for Cultural Resource Work

Washington – The National Park Service has awarded the 2012 Appleman-Judd-Lewis Awards to eight individuals for excellence in cultural resource stewardship and management.  This year’s recipients are Joy Beasley, acting superintendent, Monocacy National Battlefield; David Bittermann, Chief,  Design and Preservation Research Branch,  Historic Architecture, Conservation and Engineering Center, Northeast Regional Office; Kevin Brandt, superintendent, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park; Ed Clark, superintendent, Manassas National Battlefield Park; Eileen Devinney, Cultural Anthropologist and Regional Native American Graves Protection Repatriation Act Coordinator, Alaska Regional Office; Rae Emerson, acting superintendent, Monocacy National Battlefield; Rebecca Harriett, superintendent, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park; and Susan Trail, Superintendent, Antietam National Battlefield.  The awards were given by National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis in a November 22 ceremony at the Department of the Interior headquarters in Washington, D.C.

“Our national parks represent the best of our nation and the Appleman-Judd-Lewis Award in turn represents the best of our people,” said Director Jarvis. “The award recipients have set a standard against which many will measure their own accomplishments in the years ahead and I am grateful for their commitment to our nation’s cultural resources which are entrusted to the care of the National Park Service.”

The Appleman-Judd-Lewis Awards recognize expertise and outstanding contributions to cultural resource stewardship and management by permanent full-time employees of the National Park Service. Offered annually, the awards were created to encourage creativity in cultural resource stewardship and management practices and projects, particularly those that may serve as examples or models for programs throughout the National Park Service.  Established in 1970, the awards are named for three distinguished former National Park Service employees: historian Roy E. Appleman, historical architect Henry A. Judd, and curator Ralph H. Lewis.  The 2012 recipients are:

Cultural Resource Stewardship for Superintendents

Joy Beasley, acting superintendents, Monocacy National Battlefield

Kevin Brandt, superintendent, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

Ed Clark, superintendent, Manassas National Battlefield Park

Rae Emerson, acting superintendent, Monocacy National Battlefield

Rebecca Harriett, superintendent, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

Susan Trail, Superintendent, Antietam National Battlefield

The superintendents and acting superintendents of these five parks are recognized for their development of a shared vision and plans to commemorate the 150th anniversary of three significant Civil War events commemorated by their parks in the late summer and early fall of 2012:  the 1862 Northern Virginia Campaign, the Maryland Campaign, and the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.  During the planning period, this core group dedicated and focused their efforts on creating multi-faceted and multi-park anniversary events associated with historic events.

Through their leadership and collaboration, the anniversary events were coordinated across park boundaries, provided visitors with a wide variety of educational materials, identified and pooled subject matter experts for planning and staffing the events, and formulated strategies for protection of park resources during the heavily attended events.

Cultural Resource Stewardship through Maintenance

David Bittermann, Chief, Design and Preservation Research Branch, Historic Architecture, Conservation and Engineering Center, Northeast Regional Office.

David Bitterman is recognized for his day-to-day impact on the preservation of historic structures at the Northeast Region’s more than 80 parks. He is a recognized technical expert in maintaining interior environments in historic house museums and helps ensure that the design and installation of environmental equipment works in harmony with the structures and their environmental requirements.

At Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, he worked closely with architects, engineers, and curators to ensure that a project to improve the interior of the house would not affect its historic character.  This was accomplished through meticulous recording of the existing interior environment, thermal imaging, and infiltration analysis of the structure. This produced a detailed understanding of how the structure was performing and the optimum means for improving that performance through discrete and carefully targeted measures.  His work advances the National Park Service’s ability to ensure the long term preservation of our cultural resources in a sustainable manner.

Cultural Resource Management

Eileen Devinney, Cultural Anthropologist and Regional Native American Graves Protection Repatriation Act Coordinator, Alaska Regional Office

Eileen is recognized for her six years of service to Western Arctic National Parklands—as cultural resource program manager from 2005-2009 and as the Alaska regional cultural anthropologist from 2010 to 2012. She has been a leader in the region, seeking to establish appropriate contacts and protocol in NPS communications with Alaska’s Native communities.  Her familiarity with native cultures and the friendships she has developed over the years with village residents are considered resources which can be called upon by parks. She has been a source of timely advice to managers who are new, unfamiliar, or unaware of local situations which have the potential to turn molehills into public relations mountains.

In the summer of 2010, Eileen was able to intervene in a situation resulting from the inadvertent discovery of a human burial in an ancient house being excavated by NPS researchers in Bering Land Bridge. The following summer, work in Kobuk Valley resulted in another discovery of human remains. The site was a late prehistoric village to which local residents attached supernatural importance. Eileen was able to assist the superintendent in resolving misunderstandings and facilitating consultation with the villagers.

The result was a plan of action that was satisfactory to both the villagers and the archeologists. This process will give the park a better understanding of how people of the region feel about large excavations and will allow the NPS to make better decisions about permitting excavations in the future.

For photographs of the winners and more information, please see www.nps.gov/aboutus/appleman-judd-lewis-awards.htm.

 

Note to editors – Images of the award recipients and ceremony are available from mike_litterst@nps.gov

 

NPS

 

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's  401  national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at: www.nps.gov.

 




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