• sun setting over the gorge

    New River Gorge

    National River West Virginia

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Nuttallburg Trails

Coal Conveyor at Nuttallburg
 
 
Hikers at the Nuttallburg Headhouse

Headhouse Trail

0.7 miles (1.13 km) Moderate

This gravel trail (administrative road) leads to the entrance of the Nuttall coal mine and top of the coal conveyor, used to transport coal from the mine to the processing area at river level. Learn more about this mine operation from exhibits at this site. Stairs next to the conveyor allow a closer look at the conveyor structure. Note: Climbing, sitting, or walking on walls and other constructed features weakens them. Please leave historic structures and artifacts as you find them, where they help tell the story of the past.

To reach the trailhead:
Turn onto Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) off US 19 in Lansing, just north of Canyon Rim Visitor Center. Travel 2.5 miles, then turn right onto Beauty Mountain Road (CO 85/5). Travel 0.1 miles, then turn right onto the road just beyond Nuttall Cemetery Road. The small parking area is located next the gate, the start of the Headhouse Trail (administrative road). *NOTE: Lansing-Edmond Road is a small, curvy road. Use caution while driving and be prepared to cooperate with other drivers.

 
young hiker walking under coal conveyor

Conveyor Trail:

0.8 miles (1.29 km) Strenuous

This steep, rugged trail zig-zags from the mid-bench level, not far from the mine entrance, to the old Keeneys Creek railroad line (trail). Views of the conveyor and gorge is visible from time to time, but be sure to watch your footing, for the trail surface is loose and slaggy (old coal debris from the conveyor) in many places. Evidence of this mine's operation is visible along the trail. Be sure to leave historic artifacts as you find them, where they help tell the story of the past.

This trail junctions off the Headhouse Trail and Keeneys Creek Rail Trail. See the directions to the trailheads for these trails.

 
bike rider passing under coal conveyor

Keeneys Creek Rail Trail

3.3 miles (5.31 km) easy

This former rail line once connected the mines and communities up Keeneys Creek to Nuttallburg and the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway mainline. Enjoy a leisurely stroll or bike ride on this wide trail that criss-crosses the rugged mountain landscape at a 4% grade. Here it is easy to see how the rugged terrain was a great challenge to those who constructed this railroad line over 100 years ago. This trail crosses under the conveyor, plus several trestle bridges offer spectacular views of scenic mountain streams, like Short Creek. Trail connections can be made from this trail to the Conveyor Trail and Town Loop Connector Trail.

To reach the trailhead:
This trail has two small trailhead parking areas on Keeneys Creek Road. To get to these parking areas, turn onto Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) off US 19 in Lansing, just north of Canyon Rim Visitor Center. Travel 6.0 miles to Winona, then turn right onto Keeneys Creek Road (CO 85/2). Travel 2.0 miles to the first trailhead parking area, just past the second bridge. Travel an additional 1.5 miles down this road to the second trailhead parking area on the right. *NOTE: Lansing-Edmond Road and Keeneys Creek Road are both very small, curvy roads, including some single lane sections. Use caution while driving and be prepared to cooperate with other drivers; this may include reversing.

Winona can also be reached by traveling US 60 to Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) in Lookout. Travel 2.1 miles down Lansing-Edmond Road to Winona, then continue straight ahead 2.0 miles on Keeneys Creek Road (CO 85/2) to the first trailhead parking area or an additional 1.5 miles to the second parking area.

 

Town Loop Connector Trail

0.3 Miles (0.48 km) Moderate

Get a glimpse of Nuttallburg's community life on this trail through a residential area of Nuttallburg. Foundations of a home can be seen along the way; an exhibit in this area shows what life was like in this once bustling community. Note: Climbing, sitting, or walking on walls and other constructed features weakens them. Please leave historic structures and artifacts as you find them, where they help tell the story of the past.

This trail connects Keeneys Creek Rail Trail to Town Loop Trial.

 

Town Loop Trail

0.5 miles (0.8 km) Moderate

Get a glimpse of Nuttallburg's community life on this trail that loops around a residential area of Nuttallburg. Foundations of a church, school, and homes are visible along the way; exhibits in this area show what life was like in this once bustling community. Note: Climbing, sitting, or walking on walls and other constructed features weakens them. Please leave historic structures and artifacts as you find them, where they help tell the story of the past. Trail connections can be made from this trail to the Tipple Trail and Town Loop Connector Trail.

To reach the trailhead:
Turn onto Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) off US 19 in Lansing, just north of Canyon Rim Visitor Center. Travel 6.0 miles to Winona, then turn right onto Keeneys Creek Road (CO 85/2). Travel 4.1 miles to the Nuttallburg parking area (accessable parking is located an additional 0.10 mile beyond the main parking area. *NOTE: Lansing-Edmond Road and Keeneys Creek Road are both very small, curvy roads, including some single lane sections. Use caution while driving and be prepared to cooperate with other drivers; this may include reversing.

Winona can also be reached by traveling US 60 to Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) in Lookout. Travel 2.1 miles down Lansing-Edmond Road to Winona, then continue straight ahead 4.1 miles on Keeneys Creek Road (CO 85/2) to the Nuttallburg parking area.

 
coke oven

Tipple Trail

0.6 miles (0.96 km) Easy

This trail reveals both the industrial and community side of Nuttallburg through structures and exhibits along the trail. Travel down the trail (west) to see the conveyor and tipple system used in this operation, designed by Henry Ford in the 1920s. A long battery of coke ovens lies beyond the conveyor, where coal was processed into coke for use as fuel in steel production. You can also walk back on the road from the parking area to see remains of the clubhouse and site of the post office. Cross Short Creek bridge to get a glimpse into the life of African Americans who lived in this segregated community. Note: Climbing, sitting, or walking on walls and other constructed features weakens them. Please leave historic structures and artifacts as you find them, where they help tell the story of the past.

*Mountain bike riding is only permitted on the trail section that runs from the parking areas, crosses under the conveyor, and runs parallel with the top of the coke oven battery (see map). All visitors who want to see the front of the coke ovens or under the tipple structure must walk to these areas.

To reach the trailhead:
Turn onto Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) off US 19 in Lansing, just north of Canyon Rim Visitor Center. Travel 6.0 miles to Winona, then turn right onto Keeneys Creek Road (CO 85/2). Travel 4.1 miles to the Nuttallburg parking area (accessible parking is located an additional 0.10 mile beyond the main parking area. *NOTE: Lansing-Edmond Road and Keeneys Creek Road are both very small, curvy roads, including some single lane sections. Use caution while driving and be prepared to cooperate with other drivers; this may include backing up.

Winona can also be reached by traveling US 60 to Lansing-Edmond Road (CO 5/82) in Lookout. Travel 2.1 miles down Lansing-Edmond Road to Winona, then continue straight ahead 4.1 miles on Keeneys Creek Road (CO 85/2) to the Nuttallburg parking area.

 

Seldom Seen Trail

0.3 miles (0.48 km) Easy

Seldom Seen served as a small residential community for some families of those employed at Nuttallburg. Follow this trail to the town site, where a foundation here or there are all that remain, evidence of an earlier time and life in the New River Gorge.

This trail junctions off the Tipple Trail at the downstream/west end of the coke oven battery, next to the foundation of the company store.

Did You Know?

View of New River at McCreery, WV

The New River was designated an American Heritage River on July 30, 1998. There are currently fourteen American Heritage Rivers in the country.