• Historic buildings and the waterfront in New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

    New Bedford Whaling

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

Dock-U-Mentaries Film Series-February 2013

Overview of fishing boat at sea

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News Release Date: January 31, 2013
Contact: Laura Orleans, 508-993-8894

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

Media Contact: Laura Orleans, Director, Working Waterfront Festival

508-993-8894 info@workingwaterfrontfestival.org

February Programs Present a Look Back to the Days of Wooden Boats and Iron Men

New Bedford, Mass. - The Dock-U-Mentaries Film Series continues in February with two programs which look back to the days of wooden boats and iron men: Dad, I Wanna Go Fishin' on Sunday, February 3rd and Port of New Bedford Then and Now on Friday, February 15th. Dock-U-Mentaries is a co-production of New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park and the Working Waterfront Festival. Films about the working waterfront are screened on the third Friday of each month beginning at 7:00 PM in the theater of the Corson Maritime Learning Center, located at 33 William Street in downtown New Bedford. All programs are open to the public and presented free of charge.

2PM Sunday, February 3 - Dad, I Wanna Go Fishin'
Dad, I Wanna Go Fishin'
is an intimate portrait of commercial fishing on the F/V Little Infant out of Provincetown. The 90 minute film combines footage from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s with expert narration by retired fisherman, Peter R. Cook. The film premiered in June 2012 at the Provincetown International Film Festival and was produced by Peter R. Cook and Paul deRuyter. Mr. Cook will be on hand to introduce the film and answer questions following the screening.

7PM Friday, February 15 - Port of New Bedford Then and Now
Phil Mello has been documenting New Bedford's working waterfront since 1975. He will share his photographs and observations about the port. Mr. Mello is Plant Manager at Bergie's Seafood and is the immediate past President of the New Bedford Port Society. Jim Dwyer and Paul Swain, who worked on the New Bedford waterfront for over 50 years, will share their collection of waterfront nicknames and some of the stories behind them.

The Working Waterfront Festival is a project of the Community Economic Development Center of Southeastern MA, a non-profit organization. The free festival, a family friendly, educational celebration of New England's commercial fishing industry, features live maritime and ethnic music, fishermen's contests, fresh seafood, vessel tours, author readings, cooking demonstrations, kids' activities and more. It all takes place on working piers and waterfront parks in New Bedford, MA, America's #1 fishing port, on the last full weekend in September, this year on September 29 and 30. www.workingwaterfrontfestival.org.

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park was established by Congress in 1996 to help preserve and interpret America's nineteenth century whaling industry. The park, which encompasses a 13-block National Historic Landmark District, is the only National Park Service area addressing the history of the whaling industry and its influence on the economic, social, and environmental history of the United States. The National Park visitor center is located at 33 William Street in downtown New Bedford. It is open seven days a week, from 9 AM-5 PM, and offers information, exhibits, and a free orientation movie every hour on the hour from 10 AM-3 PM. For more information, call the visitor center at 508-996-4095, go to www.nps.gov, or visit the park's Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/NBWNHP

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Arrival of a party from Norfolk Virginia at League Island. Some members of this party wound up in New Bedford.

Between 1840 and 1860 some 300-700 escaped slaves were living in New Bedford. Frederick Douglass was among those who found freedom in New Bedford. He arrived in 1838 after escaping from Baltimore carrying another sailor's protection papers.