• Historic buildings and the waterfront in New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

    New Bedford Whaling

    National Historical Park Massachusetts

1850s ladies share recipes for AHA night

1850s ladies
Ruth and Abby love to share their recipes!
NPS

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News Release Date: September 2, 2014
Contact: Emily G. Prigot, 508-996-4095 x 6105

As a port, New Bedford became a home to many different cultures, all of which left their mark on local cuisine. Come taste a sampling of recipes from the friends and neighbors of Ruth and Abby, New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park's 1850s ladies, on AHA! (Art, History, Architecture) night, September 11, from 6:00-8:00 PM.A receipt (recipe) book has been compiled for you to take with you.This month's theme is Taste of New Bedford's Cultures. The event takes place at New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park's visitor center, 33 William Street, downtown New Bedford. As always, the event is open to all, and admission is free. For more information about AHA! night, go to http://www.ahanewbedford.org/

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park was established by Congress in 1996 to help preserve and interpret America's nineteenth century whaling industry.The park, which encompasses a 13-block National Historic Landmark District, is the only National Park Service area addressing the history of the whaling industry and its influence on the economic, social, and environmental history of the United States.The National Park visitor center is located at 33 William Street in downtown New Bedford. It is open seven days a week, from 9 AM-5 PM, and offers information, exhibits, and a free orientation movie every hour on the hour from 10 AM-4 PM.The visitor center is wheelchair-accessible, and is free of charge.For more information, call the visitor center at 508-996-4095, go to www.nps.gov/nebe or visit the park's Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/NBWNHP.

 

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