• Betatakin

    Navajo

    National Monument Arizona

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  • Flash Flooding

    Flash flooding occurs in the Tsegi Canyon during the summer season and will cause concellation of the Keet Seel and Betatakin hikes. Please check the weather for Betatakin Arizona at the NOAA website linked below. More »

  • New carpet installation

    New carpets will be installed at the visitor center in September 2014. Watch out for carpet installers and other visitors. Museum and auditorium will also be close during carpet installation. Thank you for your patience.

  • Phone Down & Internet Down

    IT will be working on the phone line and internet and these services will be down for today September 8, 2014.

Guided Tours

Betatakin tours are free! Groups leave daily during the summer season with a ranger. Summer season begins May 25, 2014 and ends September 06, 2014.

The 8:15 A.M. Betatakin Tour is a strenuous 5-mile round-trip hike and takes 3 to 5 hours using the Tsegi Point Trail. The trail head begins at 7,300 ft. elevation; loses and regains 700 feet (218 meters). Please wear sturdy shoes and bring 2 liters of water. You will need to drive to the trail head following the ranger from the Visitor Center.

The 10:00 A.M. Betatakin Tour is a very strenuous 3-mile round-trip hike and takes 3 to 4 hours. The tour begins at the Visitors Center at 7,300 ft. elevation, then by Sandal Trail, and continuing down the Aspen Trail. Elevation loss is 700 feet (218 meter) to the bottom of the canyon.

Caution: If you have hip, knee, heart, respiratory problems or recent surgery, please do not attempt any of the guided hikes.

Summer season: Hikes leave at 8:15 A.M. and 10 A.M. We observe Mountain Daylight Savings Time--the same as Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado: check your time!

Winter season: October through April (2014) All cliff dwelling tours are closed.

Click "here" to download 2014 Betatakin tour information in a pdf format.

There is a hazard from falling rock in the Betatakin alcove. We cannot predict if, when, or where, a rock may fall. Sandstone flakes off, which is how the alcove is created. Tours are led to the opening of the alcove, this is still a good tour and view.

 
134 rooms; 100 people.  These farmers left in 1300, headed to Hopi.
Betatakin Inside Alcove
Marc Steuben
 

Keet Seel hikes requires advance reservation and obtaining a backcountry permit at the visitor center. Daily limit is 20 people for this 17-mile round-trip hike on a primitive backcountry trail; elevation loss and regain is 1000 feet. The hike will lead down steep switchback trails and uneven steps, and continue down a sandy slope and once at the bottom, there will be rocks, and expect to hike across ankle-deep stream many times

Keet Seel reservations are subject to cancellation during severe weather conditions during the summer monsoon season which last from July to September. Keet Seel is located within the Tsegi Canyon system and severe flooding does occur. Flashflooding creates quicksand which is dangerous for all hikers. It is advisable to call ahead for weather conditions so that unnecessary trips and disappointments are avoided.

Click "here" to download 2014 Keet Seel hiking information in a pdf format.

During the warmer months, hikers may choose to dayhike or stay overnight in the designated campground near Keet Seel.

Orientation times are 8:15 A.M. and 3:00 P.M., when you receive your permit. You are required to have your Orientation before recieving a permit to hike to Keet Seel. Permits should be with you at all times while hiking to and from Keet Seel. All Keet Seel hikers should be on the trail and enroute to Keet Seel by 9:00AM local time.

Bring at least 1 gallon of water/person/day, for the stream is shared with livestock. Ranger on site at Keet Seel will guide you through Keet Seel.

Keet Seel is close during winter months and also part of spring; call for reservation: 928-672-2700.

 
154 rooms; 150 people.  They left rock art, corn cobs, and pot sherds.
Down the Street at Keet Seel
Marc Steuben

Did You Know?

Tsegi Canyon

Most pueblo villages in Tsegi canyon were built in the canyon bottoms or on the mesa tops. Over the past seven centuries wind, rain, and snow has reduced them to piles of rubble. Most of the cliff pueblos survive because they were built in alcoves.