• A curve along the Natchez Trace Parkway with fall colors

    Natchez Trace

    Parkway AL,MS,TN

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  • Short Construction Delays Possible Near Tupelo, MS (milepost 264.4)

    Repairs on a bridge will require one-lane closures of the Parkway for about 1/4 mile near Tupelo. Work is expected to be completed in fall of 2014. Please use caution due to construction traffic around the work area. More »

  • Portion of National Scenic Trail Near Tupelo Closed to Hikers

    Part of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail (NOT the Parkway) near Tupelo, MS, has been closed until 2015 due to construction under Tupelo's Major Thoroughfare Construction Project. Parkway travelers may expect delays, but no detours are expected. More »

Tupelo to the Tennessee Line

This portion of the Parkway map will help you plan your visit from Tupelo, Mississippi north through Alabama.

 
Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center near Tupelo, Mississippi.

The Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center is open year round, except Christmas Day, and contains interpretive displays on the history and culture of the Natchez Trace.

NPS Photo

The Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center, located at milepost 266, has a twelve-minute orientation film, interpretive displays about the natural and cultural history of the Natchez Trace, as well as an Eastern National Bookstore. A park ranger is available from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm daily (except Christmas Day) to answer any questions you may have. This is also the location to get your passport stamps for the Natchez Trace Parkway, Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail, Tupelo National Battlefield, and Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield.
 
Unknown Confederate gravesites

A short walk on the Old Trace takes you to thirteen Confederate gravesites.

NPS Photo

A short walk on the Old Trace at milepost 269.4 will take you to 13 Confederate gravesites. The identity and cause of death of these 13 Confederate soldiers remain a mystery.
 
Pharr Mounds contains eight mounds and an interpretive display

Three of the six visible (eight total) mounds at the Pharr Mounds site. 

Photo by Marc Muench

If you were at milepost 286.7 about 2000 years ago, you may have seen a busy village full of people. The Pharr Mounds Site contains eight mounds that vary from two feet to 18 feet high, and represent the lives of people from the Middle Woodland period. Interpretive waysides explain the mound building process and life in the village.

 
A view of the John Coffee Memorial Bridge from the Colbert Ferry Site.  Image copyright nps/marc muench.

Today there is a bridge over the Tennessee River, but in the early 1800's George Colbert operated a ferry across the river.

Photo by Marc Muench

Today a bridge takes you across the Tennessee River, but at milepost 327.3 George Colbert operated a stand and ferry at this spot in the early 1800's. Colbert Ferry is a great place to enjoy a picnic by the river, or to use the boat launch for fishing and boating on the Tennessee River.

 
A view of the stepping stones at the Rock Spring Nature Trail.

The stepping stones at the Rock Spring Nature Trail take visitors to views of Colbert Creek.

NPS Photo

The Rock Spring Nature Trail at milepost 330.2 is a short half mile loop trail that takes you past Colbert Creek and away from the traffic of the parkway. In late summer when the jewelweed is in bloom, visitors may be rewarded with views of the ruby-throated hummingbirds as they migrate south.

Did You Know?

Meriwether Lewis Monument, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tennessee

Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, was governor of the Upper Louisiana Territory when he died on the Natchez Trace in 1809, at Grinder's Stand in Tennessee. A monument was erected in his honor in 1848 and can be seen along the Natchez Trace Parkway today.