• A curve along the Natchez Trace Parkway with fall colors

    Natchez Trace

    Parkway AL,MS,TN

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  • Short Construction Delays Possible Near Tupelo, MS (milepost 264.4)

    Repairs on a bridge will require one-lane closures of the Parkway for about 1/4 mile near Tupelo. Work is expected to be completed in fall of 2014. Please use caution due to construction traffic around the work area. More »

  • Portion of National Scenic Trail Near Tupelo Closed to Hikers

    Part of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail (NOT the Parkway) near Tupelo, MS, has been closed until 2015 due to construction under Tupelo's Major Thoroughfare Construction Project. Parkway travelers may expect delays, but no detours are expected. More »

  • Ammendments to the Superintendent's Compendium

    Launching, landing or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of the Natchez Trace Parkway is prohibited except as approved in writing by the superintendent. More »

Natchez Trace Parkway to Tackle Non-Native Kudzu Vine

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Date: September 25, 2013
Contact: Dr. Lisa McInnis, 662-680-4055

The National Park Service announces that contractors will be working to eradicate kudzu along the Natchez Trace Parkway from Clinton to Natchez MS.    Visitors can expect to see workers spraying herbicide alongside the Parkway from milepost 0-90 during late September-early October.

Kudzu is an aggressive non-native vine that can completely overtake natural areas.  The vine is native to Japan and China, and was introduced to the US in the late 1800's for erosion control. However, the lack of natural predators allows kudzu to grow unchecked, which in turn threatens native habitat.  The Parkway treats approximately 50 acres of kudzu per year, and continues to reduce the total amount of kudzu on NPS land.

The Natchez Trace Parkway upholds the mission of National Park Service to conserve natural resources in such a manner as will leave them unimpaired for future generations.

Did You Know?

The Sunken Trace at mile post 41.5 on the Natchez Trace Parkway

The "Sunken Trace" at milepost 41.5 on the Natchez Trace Parkway was caused by thousands of travelers walking over the easily eroded loess soil.