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Bridge Replacements in Alabama

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Date: March 30, 2007

Construction work to replace the Natchez Trace Parkway’s bridges over Lindsey Creek (Mile Post 337.5), Threet Creek (Mile Post 338.4), and Lauderdale County Road 85 (Mile Post 338.9) is scheduled to begin April 2, 2007. The project, planned to be completed by summer of 2009, replaces three Parkway bridges that are in the most need of repair.

A detour will be in place for the duration of the project. Parkway visitors headed north will need to exit near Mile Post 336.3 onto Alabama State Highway 20, travel west approximately 1/10 mile to Lauderdale County Road 5, travel north approximately five miles to Lauderdale County Road 10, then travel east approximately 1/10 mile back to the Parkway.  See a map of the detour.

Parkway visitors headed south will need to exit near Mile Post 340.8 onto Lauderdale County Road 10, travel west approximately 1/10 of a mile to Lauderdale County Road 5, travel south approximately five miles to Alabama State Highway 20, then travel east approximately 1/10 mile to the Parkway.

Travelers planning to use Lauderdale County Road 85 near the Parkway are encouraged to be prepared to use other local roads while this underpass is closed throughout the project.

Travelers should expect to see construction personnel and equipment, and are asked to exercise caution while traveling through this area.

Questions related to this work can be directed to the Parkway’s Chief of Maintenance, Rusty Rawson, at (662) 680-4020.

Did You Know?

The Sunken Trace at mile post 41.5 on the Natchez Trace Parkway

The "Sunken Trace" at milepost 41.5 on the Natchez Trace Parkway was caused by thousands of travelers walking over the easily eroded loess soil.