• A curve along the Natchez Trace Parkway with fall colors

    Natchez Trace

    Parkway AL,MS,TN

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  • Short Construction Delays Possible Near Tupelo, MS (milepost 264.4)

    Repairs on a bridge will require one-lane closures of the Parkway for about 1/4 mile near Tupelo. Work is expected to be completed in fall of 2014. Please use caution due to construction traffic around the work area. More »

  • Portion of National Scenic Trail Near Tupelo Closed to Hikers

    Part of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail (NOT the Parkway) near Tupelo, MS, has been closed until 2015 due to construction under Tupelo's Major Thoroughfare Construction Project. Parkway travelers may expect delays, but no detours are expected. More »

  • Ammendments to the Superintendent's Compendium

    Launching, landing or operating an unmanned aircraft from or on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service within the boundaries of the Natchez Trace Parkway is prohibited except as approved in writing by the superintendent. More »

John Gordon, Captain of the Spies

Gordon House

Gordon House

Captain John Gordon, a loyal friend of Andrew Jackson who proved his worth many times over during the hardships of the Creek War, was also one of the first people to take advantage of the designation of the Natchez Trace as a national road. He formed a partnership with William Colbert, a Chickasaw leader and veteran of the Revolutionary War, to run a ferry and stand, or inn, on the Duck River just inside Chickasaw territory. Gordon managed the day to day operations of the site from his home in Nashville, Tennessee. When the Chickasaw ceded the land in 1805, the state of Tennessee granted it to Gordon based on his prior improvements.

Gordon moved his family permanently to the Duck River site in 1812, and shortly thereafter went to fight the Red Stick faction of Creek with Jackson. While he helped Jackson put down mutinous militia and gained a reputation for his fearlessness in battle, his wife, Dolly, managed the land. Gordon returned in 1814, but then was called away again in 1818 when Jackson needed him to command a company of "spies" (scouts) for a campaign against the Seminole. Though frequently apart, John and Dolly planned to build a new home, which became one of the most elegant on the frontier at the time. Gordon sent letters to his wife describing his vision, and Dolly oversaw the construction.

John Gordon returned to his completed home later in 1818, but died a short time later in June of 1819. Dolly Gordon remained at their house until her death in 1859. The home they planned together still stands at milepost 407.7 on the Parkway.

Did You Know?

The Tennessee River along the Natchez Trace Parkway

George Colbert operated a stand and ferry to cross the Tennessee River and is rumored to have charged Andrew Jackson $75,000 to ferry his army across the river.